Caring For A Loved One And Their Skin


There is approximately 43.5 million caregivers in the US that are unpaid, meaning they’re usually taking the responsibility of caring for family and friends. Skin thins and loses its elasticity as it ages, making it more prone to dryness, injury and ulcers. These can all be serious for a senior as they can’t fight off infections as effectively, so if you’re their caregiver you need to stay informed of skin conditions, how to prevent them and how to treat them.

Worried About Wrinkles?

As you hit middle age it’s common to start focusing on creams to eliminate wrinkles, but various skin conditions can present themselves posing a bigger problem. 1 out of 10 middle aged men and women will experience the redness, stinging, spots and regular cheek flushing of rosacea, making it a physically and emotionally distressing condition. While there is no cure for rosacea, it can be treated, and triggers can be avoided to improve symptoms. Triggers can be stress, food, alcohol and caffeine, so identifying what causes your flare ups will benefit your skin. Home treatments include regularly hydrating the skin with antibacterial moisturizers, like coconut oil, and cleaning the skin with cold green tea, which is known for its antibacterial properties.

Pressure Ulcers 

Elderly skin can become complicated to care for with a lot of issues, often dependent on lifestyle, habits and genetics. In America 43% of senior citizens require help with daily tasks with many being entirely dependent on caregivers. Being confined to a bed or sitting for the majority of the day can cause skin to breakdown and result in pressure ulcers. These are sores that need regular medical attention and can go as deep as the muscle and bone. They are notoriously difficult to heal; especially as elderly skin doesn’t repair or renew skin cells as quickly as younger skin does. If you’re a caregiver for an elderly person it’s important to regularly check their skin in pressure areas, such as their buttocks and heels of the feet. If skin is discoloured or starting to break down seek medical help to avoid them getting worse, reposition the person regularly and apply barrier creams to reduce the risk of pressure ulcers.

Tips For Caregivers 

As we age we don’t need to bathe as often as we move around a lot less. Frequent washing can cause skin to dry out, so showering or bathing your loved one three to four times a week is better and applying a moisturizer afterwards will help to keep it hydrated. Dry, itchy skin affects more than 30 million Americans, and while it may seem like a small problem, it can quickly escalate into bigger issues for senior skin. Trimming your loved ones nails will reduce the risk of them scratching accidentally catching and tearing the skin, which can easily lead to infections. If they do get a cut make sure it’s kept clean to reduce the risk and monitor how it’s healing.

Being a caregiver is one of the most rewarding things you can do in your life, especially when you’re giving back to a loved one by doing so. It’s also a very emotional and stressful experience as you are responsible for another person’s wellbeing. Skincare is an easy aspect of caregiving to overlook when there is many other medical conditions going on and needs to be met. Having a simple skincare routine to follow with them is the easiest way to also meet their skincare needs.

Guest blogger Jess Walter  is a freelance writer and mother. She loves the freedom that comes with freelance life and the additional time it means she gets to spend with her family and pets. You can contact Jess at: jesswalterwriter@gmail.com

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Using Stories to Cope With Caregiving


cropped-wp-pj-banner-e1532350609729Caregiving is one of the most challenging things to do in life, whether you’re caring for an aging parent or a disabled loved one. It’s important for caregivers to take the time to take care of themselves, but that can be difficult when you’re caring for someone who needs round-the-clock care.

Sharing stories — both your own stories as a caregiver and stories from other caregivers — can help you learn how to cope with caregiving. In fact, listening to others’ stories can help you grieve, cope and thrive as a caregiver.

Finding Stories

Where can you find caregiver stories to help you cope with your own situation? That can be more difficult than you might think, as not everyone is comfortable telling their story. However, you can tap into plenty of resources to find these tales of hope.

The Whole Care Network is a web-based resource that shares caregiver stories in blog posts and also in the form of the podcast. This is a great place to find stories similar to your own and even tell your own story if you feel comfortable doing so. Other websites, like Caregiver.org, allow you to do the same — read the stories others have submitted and even submit your own.

Sites like Medium, the free blog publishing platform, can give you a voice. Platforms like Medium are often better for this than starting your own blog because they come with a built-in audience, so you can tell your story without the stress of marketing your content.

There are even videos and documentaries that might help you puzzle out the problems of your daily life as a caregiver. Do a little research and you’ll be pleasantly surprised at how many resources you find to share your story online.

Telling Stories

Have you ever considered telling your own caregiver’s story?

Not everyone does. Sharing a story about your experiences as a caregiver is an emotional decision, but it is one that could help other individuals who are having problems with their own situations.

If you’re having trouble with one aspect of your life, writing about it can help you look at it from a new perspective. In addition to this, the story you share about your own struggles might help someone else who is going through the same thing.

You don’t have to write or publish a book for people to listen — just write your story and share it.

It’s All About Hope

Being a caregiver isn’t easy, even for the strongest person. The one thing everyone has to hold on to is hope, and hearing stories from others who are going through similar experiences can help make it easier to hold on to that sliver of hope. Hearing stories of someone else’s grief can also help you in navigating your own experiences.

Sharing stories is all about hope. That’s why sharing your own stories and reading the stories of others is so important — to foster hope for the future, hope for a better life and hope that you’ll be able to make it through your next day as a caregiver.

Authors Bio: Kayla Matthews is a lifestyle and productivity writer whose work has been featured on Lifehacker, The Next Web, MakeUseOf and Inc.com. You can read more posts from Kayla on her blog, Productivity Theory.

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Money Conversation: How to Manage the Finances of Your Aging Parents


Your parents might need a little extra help in their advanced age. Their finances are equally as important as their health. Aging people retire, meaning that they’re unlikely to come into any new sources of income. The money they have is the money they have, and it needs to last an indefinite period of time.

Talk to your parents about financial security as soon as possible to ensure their safe future.

Create a Productive Financial Environment

You parents may feel a deep attachment to their home, but can they still afford it? If the home is already payed off and the utilities are reasonable, they may not want to sell it. If the home is highly profitable and they’re willing to downsize, the profit they acquire from the sale of their home can give them some financial padding.

Smaller homes are typically less expensive to maintain. Utility bills cost less, especially for cooling and heating. Less property means a lower cost for lawn maintenance, and if the roof ever needs to be repaired, it’s a smaller roof. On top of the financial benefits, smaller homes equipped for seniors are often easier to navigate and maintain. They may allow your parents to experience independence for longer. You might also want to investigate assisted living facilities – your parents might need some extra help.

Use Savings in Conjunction with Investments

People of advanced age need savings to cover emergency costs. If they’re still active and vital, they might even want to take the occasional trip away for a week or so to socialize and enjoy their retirement. While savings are important, it’s important to note that their growth is meager. Even in a high yield savings account, the money will still grow slowly.

Your parents are never too old to start trading. By using some of their money to trade or invest, they’ll see larger returns much faster than they would patiently waiting on a savings account to deliver interest. A massive investment isn’t necessary. They can start by investing a little bit and slowly make more investments with what they gain. This is a great way for seniors with no expandable source of income to see more money than they ordinarily would have.

Set Up Autopayments

Seniors may not remember to pay their bills on time. By setting up autopay options for the things they use everyday (like their household utilities, rent, and phone bills), they won’t need to remember to make payments on time. This will prevent service interruption. In order to prevent autopay bills from disrupting the budget, a separate account can be created and funded specifically for autopayments.

Use your parent’s main bank account for their daily, fluctuating expenses. They’ll only need to concern themselves with the , and having the bills come out of a separate account that has already been funded will prevent them from accidentally overspending and having a bill come due that will overdraft their account.

Create a Functional Budget

The kind of budget you create will largely depend on your parents’ level of independence. If they do their own shopping, rather than depending on grocery deliveries, they need to be able to understand how much money they have, as well as the minimums and maximums they can spend.

Bill money set aside, sit down with them and examine how much money they have left over. This money needs to be divided into categories and priorities. If your parents have a basic understanding of technology, you can set them up with budget tracking apps on their phones. They can input their expenses based on their receipts and actively track what they’re spending and when they’re spending it.

Simplifying your parents’ finances will allow them to enjoy their independence for as long as possible, helping them make the most of their agency and live a fulfilling life. Always be there to help when they need it.

About Audrey:

Audrey Robinson is a blogger, currently writing on behalf of online data libraries like Aubiz. She might often be found online, sharing her tips and suggestions for self-improvement, improving one’s career opportunities and living a more stress-free life. Feel free to reach out to her on @AudreyyRobinson

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7 Tips for Doing a Criminal Background Check of Your Caregiver


In some ways, a caregiver’s job is even more delicate than a babysitter’s job. Caregivers need to have medical and emergency response knowledge when providing care for a patient that has special needs. You’re entrusting this individual with a great deal of responsibility, and before you do that, a criminal background check might be in order.

  1. Inform The Caregiver of the Background Check

You might find yourself in hot water if you choose to run a background check without the consent of the individual. You should ask first and have the person sign a form that states that they consent to such check being run. The form should include all areas that will be explored during this check. Individuals who don’t consent to a background check might have something to hide – never take their word for it. Don’t work with someone who is uncomfortable with a background check.

  1. Perform Relevant Checks

If the caregiver’s job would put them in a position where they’re handling money or delicate assets, you might also want to perform a credit check on the individual. If they have a history of being reckless with money, you don’t want them to have any control over your loved one’s assets. Run these checks concurrent with the criminal background check.

  1. Know What is and Isn’t Off Limits

You may not be able to research all areas of caregivers background due to restrictions and limitations based on the availability of personal and confidential records to the public. Prying or attempting to obtain these off limits records through other means might be a crime. Never misrepresent your identity when conducting a background check and accept what’s given to you.

  1. Follow Local Laws

Every state, province, and territory has different laws regarding what information can be made available on background checks and how the person who obtained that information is allowed to use it. If you’re unsure of what you can legally do, check with a legal expert. If you live in Australia, get help from a lawyer in Australia. If you live in the United States, get advice from a lawyer located in the state you’re conducting a check in or the state where the caregiver’s record exists.

  1. Use Checks in Conjunction with References

Since some information may not be made available through a criminal background check, you’ll also need to vet a potential caregiver through their previous employers and educators. They can give you all the details and let you know if they’ve ever noticed any suspicious or borderline criminal behavior. Use this information in conjunction with the background check’s findings to make a thoroughly informed decision.

  1. Research the Agency Providing the Caregiver

It’s more likely than not that the caregiver already went through a top notch background and credentials check when they sought placement through the agency that represents them. This check may have been more thorough than your check. Talk to the agency about how they screen their caregivers. Research their history and reputation. If there haven’t been any reported problems with the caregivers they supply, chances are good that they have high standards.

  1. Speak with the Caregiver Following the Check

Even if the caregiver has a criminal record, this may not be a cause for worry. A minor marijuana charge from fifteen years ago may not have any impact on their ability to be an excellent caregiver. A disturbing the peace charge that resulted from a passionate form of activism doesn’t indicate that an individual is violent or a thief. Always speak to the caregiver about relevant findings before making a hiring decision.

While background checks help, you also need to follow your intuition. If your gut is telling you that you would be uncomfortable putting this person in charge of the care of a loved one, don’t do it. You need both the facts and your instincts on your side when making such an important decision.

Gust Writer Lucy Taylor is an avid blogger who enjoys sharing her tips and suggestions with her online readers. Working as a legal expert at LY Lawyers, Lucy often helps people dealing with legal problems, addictions and crime.  You can contact Lucy at lucytayllor.lylawyers@gmail.com

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How to Ensure Your Loved One Gets the Right Care


One thing that is sometimes inevitable is people becoming unwell. Whether it is a result of lifestyle choices or actions that could have been avoided, it could end up having lifelong effects. Caring for someone who is sick can be difficult and often requires a great amount of patience. It is also imperative that they get the best care possible to make getting through every day easier. You may be reading this because you’re a caregiver or responsible for a loved one who’s battling a long-term or terminal illness. If that happens to be the case, you’re in the right place as this article is going to tell you how to ensure your loved one gets the right care.

Know What Their Needs Are

Before you can ensure your loved one gets the best care possible, it’s imperative that you understand their needs are. In order to do this, however, you should learn as much about their disease or illness as possible. It could mean taking time out to research their condition so that you can learn about what the best solutions available are to help them cope. Another alternative is to ask a medical professional about how best to take care of them, and this is relevant whether you’re their caregiver or looking for someone else to help with regular care.

Offer the Right Care

Taking care of a loved one when they’re suffering from a terminal illness can be difficult. It is often a full-time job, so you should seriously think about if you have what it takes to give them the care they need. Some tips if you do decide to be their primary caregiver include being patient, making time for yourself, and getting help if you need it. If you do decide to get a professional caregiver to offer help, it’s important that you’re confident in the services they offer. You should also pay attention to any signs that something may be wrong. If you feel your loved one is experiencing clinical negligence, then you should contact an organization like Minton Morrill Solicitors as they may be able to offer help and advice on what you can do and if you can be compensated.

Look After You

If you decide to be a primary caregiver for an ill loved one, it’s important that you take the time out to look after yourself. It’s key that you don’t underestimate the amount of work that goes into being a caregiver and how demanding as well as emotionally, physically, and mentally tasking it can be. If you want to give the best care, it is therefore essential that you spend time doing things you love, getting out of the house for fresh air and endeavor to retain a personal life.

Getting the right care for your loved ones is extremely important, so taking the time out to explore your options is key. Aside from the tips mentioned above, your goal should be to pay attention to their needs and find ways to meet them. By doing so, you should find that you have peace of mind knowing that they get the best care possible.

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How to Help Your Loved One Overcome Insomnia


14 percent of elderly persons between the ages of 65 and 80 take prescription sleep medications on a regular basis, according to the United States National Poll on Healthy Aging. 23 percent of seniors rely on sleep medication occasionally. When a caregiver helps a loved one to create a pre-bedtime routine, avoid computer monitors and smartphones before turning in and stay away from food three hours prior to bedtime, and a senior’s sleep habits may improve dramatically.

Create a Pre-Bedtime Routine

According to the Sleephelp.org website, creating a pre-bedtime routine for a senior is one of the keys to helping a loved one avoid the ill effects of sleep deprivation, which include daytime sleepiness, cognitive problems, irritability, depression, cardiovascular health problems and greater risk of chronic diseases. To establish a routine, a caregiver should make sure that a senior has a set bedtime each night. A warm bath before bedtime is also a smart component of a good pre-bedtime routine. A study published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology shows that pre-bedtime warm baths positively impact the sleep quality of seniors.

Keep Seniors Away from Computer Monitors

Lots of seniors enjoy using computers and smartphones, just like everyone else. However, using electronic toys before bedtime may make it harder to fall asleep and stay asleep, according to a wellness blog post at The New York Times website. Devices that emit blue light, such as many electronic gadgets, are enriched with short wavelengths which negatively impact melatonin levels. Melatonin is a hormone which induces sleep. Encouraging seniors to stay away from blue light emitting-devices sixty minutes prior to bedtime should help them to enjoy better rest.

Avoid Offering Food 3 Hours Before Bedtime

According to the Health.harvard.edu website, everyone (including the elderly) should try to avoid eating for three hours before bedtime. It’s one of the secrets of stopping the endless tossing and turning. Healthy, small snacks are ok and may even be beneficial. Examples include apples and beverages which are known to promote sleep. Big meals are tough to digest and they keep the body working when it should be in sleep mode.

Try These Sensible Tips Today

Seniors sometimes need support to feel their very best. This is where loving and dedicated caregivers come in. When a caregiver puts these sleep-enhancing tips into action, a senior may fall asleep with ease and enjoy restful sleep all night long.

Guest Writer  Jess Walter  is a freelance writer and mother. She loves the freedom that comes with freelance life and the additional time it means she gets to spend with her family and pets.  You can reach Jess at <jesswalterwriter@gmail.com>

 

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6 Skills You Need to Have as a Caregiver


Whether it’s a career you want to pursue or something you want to do to use your time to give back, being a caregiver is both a challenging and rewarding experience. People do it every day all over the globe to make sure their loved ones and others get the care and help they need. It’s a selfless job for anyone who wants to take it on, and like all other jobs, you should have certain skills before you step into the role.

Beginning your journey as a caregiver before you know if you’re ready for it would be a major problem. Not only would you be putting yourself in a bad position, but you’d be preventing someone from getting the quality care they need. Read on to see which skills are most important for you to have as a caregiver.

Find out what you can do to improve those skills if you find yourself lacking, but don’t let yourself be discouraged. If you’re passionate about caregiving, that love and effort will shine through.

1. Communication

Your ability to communicate is another skill you’ll constantly improve as a caregiver. Not everyone communicates in the same way, especially if the person you’re caring for has limited communication abilities.

You’ll need to be quick to pick up how they communicate best and then work with them to become a better team. You may also need to be able to translate their needs to other family members or caregivers. Ensuring you have good communication skills will improve the lives of everyone involved with your caregiving.

2. Compassion

Compassion is something everyone should have a good grasp on, because it makes you a better person and promotes a positive environment for the people around you. It’s especially good to have as a caregiver because you’ll be able to empathize and easily understand your patient’s point of view. Showing genuine compassion will pass on a higher level of kindness to the person you’re working with, which will make them more comfortable and trusting.

3. Problem Solving

Every day, you use your problem-solving skills to get through your daily routine. You might need to locate missing supplies or adapt to quickly changing work situations. In an emergency medical situation, you could need to know legal issues of caregiving. Whatever happens, you can find a new solution, which is invaluable as a caregiver.

The person you assist will depend on you, so if something doesn’t work out according to plan, you’ll need to know how to solve problems on the go. This skill is something you’ll hone throughout your career, but be confident in it before you become a caregiver.

4. Organization

Caregiving isn’t only about meeting a person’s physical and emotional needs. It’s also about maintaining their quality of life. That means planning hospital visits, scheduling doctor appointments, keeping track of medications and balancing their social life. If you’re a caregiver for a parent, this also means you should have preparations for emergencies. Juggling all these things means you’ll need to be great at organization to be a caregiver. The better you can handle the aspects of a person’s life who needs assistance, the happier they’ll be.

5. Patience

Providing care to someone who needs it is something you can do to bring joy to their lives, but it won’t come without challenges. You’re going to be building a relationship with your patient as well as meeting their needs. These needs may seem like a lot at first, when you’re not used to what they need and how they live. Patience will be essential to your success, so practice patience daily, because going into caregiving with a quick temper won’t lead to anything good.

6. Positivity

Before you start looking after anyone, it’s always a good idea to try to consider the situation from their perspective. They may have transitioned from an independent life to one where they need to depend on someone else for help, and that can be hard. They’ll have individual challenges that will frustrate them, and you’ll need to be there for them even at their most difficult moments. Do your best to remain positive in all situations, because genuine positivity easy to share.

Giving back to someone through your job or a volunteer opportunity can change their day, week or even their whole life. Be sure you’ve got the skills you need before you enter that role. Maintaining a positive attitude, always being organized and having compassion will take you far in the role of a caregiver.

Practice these things so when the time comes for you to take care of someone in need, you can be the best person possible for them to depend on.

Authors Bio: Kayla Matthews is a lifestyle and productivity writer whose work has been featured on Lifehacker, The Next Web, MakeUseOf and Inc.com. You can read more posts from Kayla on her blog, Productivity Theory.

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Healthy Benefits of Gardening


Helping Your Loved One To Carry On Gardening In Later Years

If you are caring for someone in their twilight years, you will know just how important hobbies and recreation are for them, and indeed for you as the caregiver. It’s not just the fact of getting out in the fresh air and having something to do – although this is, of course important. The CDC has carried out research and found that just two hours of gardening per week can have a profound effect on health issues that include blood pressure, depression, maintaining a healthy weight, osteoporosis, and many other conditions.

Clearly, there are plenty of reasons for your loved one to want to carry on gardening for as long as possible – even if they have reduced mobility or other physical or medical conditions that might mean they cannot do quite as much as they used to. How can we make it easier for them?

Choose your battles

There are some activities that are clearly going to be outside the scope of someone who is frail or has restricted mobility. Trimming hedges and cutting grass are prime examples. Outside assistance is going to be necessary with the labor-intensive tasks, and you might consider weighing up the benefits of doing away with the lawn entirely in favor of artificial grass.

Maintaining flower gardens and tending vegetable beds, however, are activities that anyone can enjoy. And if you invest in a few handy tools and accessories, there is nothing to stop your loved one from continuing to enjoy his or her hobby.

Useful tools

Vertical planting beds are ideal, as they negate the need to bend or crouch down. Alternatively, raised beds have a similar effect, and can easily be made from simple containers. Even better, you can put them on casters to make them easy to move around. Also, look out for lightweight gardening equipment such as shears and clippers, or ones with easy-grip handles. These are particularly useful for those with arthritis. At a push, you can adapt existing tools using plastic tubing, foam, and tape.

Stay safe, and enjoy the garden

Take care to keep walkways clear, and sweep them regularly to avoid slip hazards. Make sure there is plenty of shade for those hot summers days, and ensure any injuries or even minor scratches are treated promptly. Finally, provide plenty of seating, so that your loved one can take time to rest and enjoy the garden – it doesn’t all have to be work, work work!

Jess Walter  is a freelance writer and mother. She loves the freedom that comes with freelance life and the additional time it means she gets to spend with her family and pets and can be reached at jessalterwriter@gmail.com

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When You Need Some Help: 5 Reasons to Join a Caregiver Support Group


In a world that seems to have lost the idea of the “village,” sometimes we feel pressured to be able to do it all. Asking for assistance or admitting that you are overwhelmed feels like failure, and we often think that we’re being judged by others as not good enough. And that’s just with normal, everyday life.

When you find yourself caring for a loved one, the pressure increases. You are expected to take on this additional burden with a smile, and your willingness to do so seems to be a measurement of your love; expressing your anger or frustration to friends and family earns you appalled looks of disbelief. The good news is that there is a village for you; a caregiver support group. Here are 5 reasons why you should think about joining one.

To Reduce Stress

Perhaps the primary reason to join a support group for caregivers is to reduce your stress levels. Simply having that hour to yourself every week is an important step in separating yourself from the role of caregiver and reclaiming your identity. Being under excessive stress can have negative consequences for both your physical health, and your mental well-being. Maintaining your own well-being is essential to being able to properly care for your loved one.

To Gain a Safe Space

You won’t find any disapproving looks or judgment in a support group. Support groups are by their very nature a confidential and judgment-free zone, where you can discuss your frustrations and less than charitable thoughts with people who understand exactly what you’re going through. They can help alleviate your feelings of guilt and inadequacy, and when you admit to selfish thoughts and attitudes, they will nod their heads and tell you that they understand.

To Reduce Feelings of Isolation

When you’re a caregiver for someone else, it’s easy to find yourself feeling alone, both literally and emotionally. When you can’t leave your loved one to go have a drink with your friends, or you spend all your waking time tending to someone else’s needs, you often find that you don’t have any social interactions. All your contacts are with the person you’re caring for, or their healthcare professionals. Emotionally, it appears nobody else understands you and it’s difficult to relate to those outside your situation. Joining a support group puts you in touch with other people who get it.

To Prevent Burnout

If you end up caring for someone else for too long, without any support system in place for yourself, you’re likely going to suffer from burnout. You’ll reach a point where caring for someone has taken such a toll on you that you are incapable of continuing, and many times, you’ll lose your identity and sense of self. Caregivers leave their support groups feeling refreshed and empowered to keep going. Members can point you in the direction of other resources and programs that can assist you. You may be able to find help with meals, respite care, or even an opportunity to hire a part-time caregiver to relieve you.

To Gain Insights and Advice

Being part of a support group is one of the best ways to find valuable advice and information about caregiving. Everyone has their own methods for dealing with stress, setting boundaries, and finding time for self-care. Having the knowledge of so many others freely available can help you to discover which tips and tricks will work best for you. They may be even able to help prepare you for what to expect down the road.

Joining a caregiver support group may be the best thing that you can do for yourself during this trying time. It will help you maintain your own well-being while caring for another.

About Audrey:

Audrey Robinson is a careers blogger, supporting online knowledge libraries like BizDb. Audrey enjoys working with people from different professions, sharing her tips for self-improvement, improving one’s career opportunities and preventing burnout. Feel free to reach out to her on @AudreyyRobinson.

 

 

 

 

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5 Lifesaving Technologies for Caregivers


No matter if you’ve chosen caregiving as a career path or are overseeing the well-being of a family member in your home, technologies exist that can make your job easier and keep the people you assist safer.

1. The AngelSense GPS Tracker

Some ailments, such as dementia, make people quickly become confused and wander away, despite their caregivers’ best efforts to ensure their safety. The AngelSense GPS tracker reduces those panic-filled moments where caregivers wonder what happened to the people they were looking after.

A person in need of care wears it on their body, and an accompanying smartphone app reveals that individual’s location. The app also allows urgently notifying first responders in the event of an emergency. A geofencing feature provides email and text alerts if a person wanders outside a defined area, too.

There are numerous other GPS tracking choices, but this one is more economical than most, even with the monthly service subscription.

Doctors regularly use wearable devices to deliver things like medication reminders or engage in remote patient monitoring. The AngelSense device lets everyday consumers realize why medical providers increasingly depend on wearables as essential parts of patient care.

($99 for the product, then $33.33 to $59.99 per month for service, depending on the plan)

2. The Carely App

When a family member isn’t doing well, loved ones become even more stressed out. Many of them provide care that seems appropriate, but don’t realize someone has already assumed responsibility for handling a certain need.

The Carely app aims to streamline communications between family members and professional caregivers to ease mental distress and overall confusion about care. It also saves time for primary caregivers by compiling information temporary providers of care can instantly access through the app.

Moreover, medical professionals can upload content to Carely, creating digital versions of paperwork.

Many of the caregiving apps on the market don’t specifically focus on family members, but Carely does. It informs everyone at once, which is particularly useful when loved ones live out of town and can’t visit the people who need care as much as they’d like.

(Free for iOS and Android)

3. Express Messaging Systems

Facilities that manage the care of numerous people at once need an efficient way to contact loved ones in case of emergencies like building maintenance issues, power outages or other unplanned events. An express messaging system distributes communications in bulk to targeted recipients, thereby saving time during hectic circumstances.

An express messaging service can also be useful inside an assisted living community to remind residents about upcoming social events or other matters related to their daily activities.

4. The Maddak Patient Handler Lifting Aid

Transfers are among the most common duties caregivers handle, whether to help a person move into an armchair or get into bed. However, improper lifting techniques can cause back strain for a caregiver and put the lifted person at risk of falling.

The Patient Handler from Maddak is a shaped piece of flexible plastic that looks like a sling and conforms to a person’s shape. It features two pairs of cutout hand grips on either side, enabling caregivers to find the best position to lift a person securely.

Other — significantly more expensive — transfer aids exist, but the comparatively low price of this option and its basic design make it user-friendly and affordable.

(Priced at $70.55 plus shipping)

5. Reminder Rosie

Caregivers have dozens of things to remember each day, and there’s always a chance they might forget a couple of them — they’re humans, after all.

Reminder Rosie helps prevent that possibility by allowing caregivers to record up to 25 custom reminders in any language to aid people in need of assistance with remembering things such as to eat regularly, exercise or take care of personal grooming. It’s possible to set reminders to go off at any day or time.

The Reminder Rosie gadget looks like a clock, but it’s mostly voice-activated, so people don’t have to fumble with cumbersome buttons. An emergency backup system ensures the product keeps working even during power outages.

(Priced at $119.95 with shipping included)

Improving Caregiving for Everyone Involved

A decision to work as a caregiver comes with challenges, but most people who choose the path realize it’s worth those momentary obstacles. The solutions listed above could reduce stress and enhance the quality of care for both patients and those who look after them.

Authors Bio: Kayla Matthews is a lifestyle and productivity writer whose work has been featured on Lifehacker, The Next Web, MakeUseOf and Inc.com. You can read more posts from Kayla on her blog, Productivity Theory.

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