Tag Archives: Seniors

How to Help Your Loved One Overcome the Fear of Asking For Help


We welcome back our guest writer Trevor to “The Purple Jacket”

Overcoming obstacles in life is only half the battle. The other half is living and functioning after the obstacle has been overcome. Addiction is a complex disease that individuals can violently be sucked into, without any recollection or realization that a substance or behavior has suddenly defined their life so dramatically. Pulling oneself out of addiction is a process – a journey that takes almost a lifetime to conquer. The desire to end an addiction is self-respect, but seeking help itself might possibly be the most frightening step, but the most courageous one and a mark of strength.

By seeking guidance outside of their own opinions, an individual with addiction is completely opening up their emotions and memories, leaving an incredibly personal part of themselves vulnerable to criticism – by no means is that a walk in the park. The fear in asking for help is completely valid and should never be something seen as humorous or a disposition to be taken lightly. Asking for help is always the hardest step. As the supporting friend, family member, or spouse – you are an assurance to your loved one that there is value in seeking help. You are their support system that provides positive affirmations and actions. Not to mention, you also remind your loved one there is a meaningful life outside of addiction, and they have so much to experience that makes life worth living, and that it can be done without unhealthy coping mechanisms and tendencies.

 First, sitting down and having an honest, raw conversation with your loved one sets everything on the table and gives you both an opportunity to share how you feel. You are able to learn why they want to take this journey. On the other hand, your loved one will always remember that someone understands their circumstances to the best of their abilities and is willing to be supportive. The utter transparency between you both is a solace, and may even make your loved one speak more easily and freely to a professional therapist or support group in the future. By your encouragement and love, it can give a loved one a little push to take the initiative to find help on their own. You can hold them accountable but also encourage their independence – because self-reliance is all that is necessary. Remember when you asked for help once? It was monumental to feel acknowledged by another human being.

 If your loved one wishes, go with them to support groups, wait in the seating area of a psychiatric office, or attend an event with them that will be a bit more bearable with a person by their side. The actual presence of someone during a difficult moment can make all the difference in the world. It is natural to be hesitant doing certain things alone, especially when particular moments require openness.

Besides meaningful conversations and formal treatments to addiction, simply having fun with your loved one is a break from anything disheartening in life. By experiencing the world outside of addiction, your loved one can see that there is truly an end-result to the recovery process. It is easy to lose oneself in addiction, question self-identity, and spiral into a dark place. But by enjoying themselves and letting go of pain – even just for a few minutes – your loved one can find pleasures in things and hobbies that they once loved, or will come to love.

 If there is one last thing that helps your loved one, it is never losing a sense of purpose from the trials of their mistakes and relapses, triumphs, and self-doubt that gives them the courage to ask for help. Life isn’t a race to see who can get to the finish line with the least amount of trauma and scars. Life is what they make it, and you hope that even through unexpected and painful bumps along the way – there is not an end, but a never-ending opportunity to give themselves an existence they have always wanted.

Trevor is a freelance writer and recovering addict & alcoholic whose been clean and sober for over 5 years. Since his recovery began he has enjoyed using his talent for words to help spread treatment resources and addiction awareness. In his free time, you can find him working with recovering addicts or outside enjoying about any type of fitness activity imaginable.  Trevor can be reached at 

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevor-mcdonald
Website: https://about.me/trevormcdonald
Email: trevorc.mcdonald@gmail.com

Leave a comment

Filed under Alcohol, Caregiving

Loneliness and Depression in Caregiving


Today we welcome guest blogger Samantha Stein to The Purple Jacket.

Stop Saying I Should Get Over It: Loneliness and Depression in Caregiving

Inevitably, our bodies will fail us. It may happen naturally through aging, or it may be because of an illness that overtook our bodies. However before the time comes, have you stopped to consider who is going to provide the caregiving that you need? And what are we going to put them through when they become our caregivers?

Who Are Today’s Caregivers?

For so long, the image of a family caregiver in the United States, and perhaps across the globe, is a 49-year old woman, juggling employment and her family’s needs. She is often perceived as caring for her 60-year old mother who does not live with her. For the older generations, this remains true as the demographic average of a family caregiver.

For the younger generations, however, the average caregiver is shifting to something different. In a joint study done by the National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP, they discovered that the millennials (age 18 to 34) have a unique take on caregiving.

Unlike their predecessors, millennial caregivers are typically 27 years old and equally likely to be male or female. The study further shares how these individuals are most often caring for their mother or grandmother. They also noted how millennials are more likely to report emotional or mental health conditions that their loved ones may be experiencing.

It is no secret that family caregivers often sacrifice their own emotional and physical needs for the well-being of their care recipients. As explained Family Caregivers: The Everyday Superheroes, caregivers go through so many life changes and expose themselves to so many different types of stress to provide the care that their loved ones need. But no matter how strong a person is perceived to be, constant feelings of stress, anxiety, exhaustion, isolation, loneliness, and all other negative emotions associated with caregiving will eventually take its toll.

 Because of a plethora of factors, family caregivers are very much susceptible to depression, loneliness, and isolation. And no should take any of these lightly.

Loneliness and Isolation

Depending on the extent of care required by their recipients, some caregivers provide care on a 24-hour basis. With this in mind, many caregivers undergo drastic changes in their lives. Their lives are dominated by the responsibility of providing care for their ill loved ones. This leaves little to no room for the much-needed me time. They are often boxed into the situation.

Often, loneliness and isolation are brought about by the withdrawal of past habits and lifestyle. Imagine watching your friends go about their lives, enjoying activities you used to do together, while you are left alone to fulfill your caregiving duties. It creates a wall between caregivers and their social circles. It may put them in a situation that lacks social interaction and stimulation from other people other than their care recipients.

Depression in Caregiving

Depression may also come into the picture. A conservative estimate states that 20% of family caregivers — twice the rate of the general population — suffer from depression. 60% of California’s Caregiver Resources Centers’ clients showed signs and symptoms. However, not many people recognize these signs or are too ashamed to admit it.

Despite all the awareness campaigns involving depression, many caregivers still see it as a sign of weakness and are too embarrassed to voice it out. Somehow, they feel guilty for being ill and taking the care and attention away from their loved ones. To make matters worse, a handful of individuals say “get over it” or “it’s all in your head” as if it is not a condition that needs to be addressed.

Depression is a complex condition, and you cannot simply “snap out of it.”

Signs to Watch Out For and What to Do about Them

Family, friends, and even the caregivers themselves must be able to pinpoint the signs and symptoms and then address them quickly.

Depression is different for each person who experiences it. The signs vary, and what many might perceive as nothing may be symptoms in actuality. To help matters, however, here are a few symptoms that might be able to pinpoint cases of depression:

  • Changes in eating habits (overeating or loss of appetite)
  • Changes in sleeping behavior
  • Feeling numb
  • Trouble focusing
  • Lack of motivation to do anything
  • Frequent mood swings

So what can we do it to address the issue or ease the risk?

  • Respite Care – These services help caregivers have time to themselves while still ensuring that their loved ones receive the necessary care that they need. It provides the relief that many caregivers do not get often.
  • Let Your Friends and Family Help You – If respite care is too costly, then share the responsibility among family members.
  • Find Support – Online communities are great venues to find people going through the same challenges and issues. Individuals in these groups help each other in facing their problems because they know exactly what it is like to go through these situations. It provides a sense of comradeship that is beneficial to the caregiver’s health.
  • Get Treatment – Depression is an illness, and it needs to be seen as such. Similar to diabetes or high blood pressure, depression needs to be brought to the attention of a professional. Bear in mind that this should not be something to be ashamed of.

Thank You Samantha for a very informative blog post on a difficult topic! chris@thepurplejacket.com

Samantha Stein is an online content manager for ALTCP.org. Her works focus on key information on long term care insurance, finance, elder care, and retirement. In line with the organization’s goal, Samantha creates content that helps raise awareness on the importance of having a comprehensive long term care plan not just for the good of the individual but for the safety of the entire family.

 

 

1 Comment

Filed under Caregiving, Guest Bloggers

An Overlooked Issue: Alcohol and Drug Addiction Among the Elderly


Today we welcome guest blogger Trevor to The Purple Jacket. 

When you think of substance abuse, you may think it’s a problem for the young. But the stats show that teens aren’t the ones at greatest risk for addiction. In fact, it could be their grandparents.

As Baby Boomers approach their senior years, they may be bringing some demons of their past. One study published by the Society for the Study of Addiction showed that marijuana use of adults over 65 grew a startling 250 percent from 2006 to 2013.

Another study found that older women and Hispanics are having more issues with alcoholism than ever before.

Why is this so alarming? Well, we know that substance abuse is harmful at any age, but it can cause more serious problems in the elderly. The risks associated with alcohol and drug abuse are much greater in your senior years.

Diagnosing the problem

Symptoms of substance abuse often mimic other symptoms that are related to the natural aging process, so alcoholism or drug abuse can easily go undetected. Many health practitioners are also unaware of the depth of this problem, and so they are unlikely to ask the right questions or run the appropriate tests.

The hidden dangers of senior addiction

As we age, our bodily functions begin slowing. This includes liver and waste removal functions that help rid the body of toxins like alcohol. When a senior consumes alcohol, it is likely to affect them faster and stay in their system longer than someone younger.

Seniors are also more likely than any other demographic group to take multiple prescription medications daily. And many common prescription drugs are dangerous when combined with alcohol or other drugs. Even over-the-counter medicines can pose a danger when combined with alcohol, so it’s important pay careful attention.

How to spot substance abuse in seniors

Although it’s more difficult to spot the signs of elderly drug and alcohol addiction in seniors, there are some red flags that can help identify a problem. If the senior in your life is exhibiting the following behaviors, it may be cause for concern.

Substance abuse warning signs

  • Desire to spend time alone – This could be a sign of secretive drinking or substance abuse.
  • Drinking rituals – Although having a little wine with dinner isn’t a crime, if it is consistent, you may want to look for other warning signs.
  • Slurred speech – If slurred speech is out of character and not related to a medical problem, there’s a possibility of substance abuse
  • Depression – A person who is depressed is more prone to substance abuse, and substance abuse may also cause depression. So if you notice that your loved one is frequently depressed, this could signal a larger problem.
  • Increased falling/balance loss – This one can be tricky because it’s not uncommon for seniors to have balance issues, but if it seems to come out of nowhere and/or is combined with other warning signs, there may be a substance abuse problem.
  • Doctor “shopping” – If the senior in your life changes doctors frequently, this is a red flag. It may be a sign that they are shopping around for multiple prescriptions.

Treatment options for senior substance abuse

Identifying the problem is the first step, but how you handle it is just as important. Communication is of the utmost importance. When you broach the subject, do so with empathy and respect. You’ll want to send the message that you’re coming from a place of love and understanding.

In many cases, older adults aren’t aware of the increased risk of senior substance abuse. Sharing this knowledge can be helpful.

There are many support groups available for helping older people remove substance abuse from their lives. These are also places where they can find the kind of fellowship that they may be missing. It’s always beneficial to have the support of people who are in a similar situation to your own.

Therapy is always a good option too. It can help him or her get to the root of the problem and begin to find solutions.

Elderly substance abuse is a growing problem that can affect any of the seniors in our lives. Look out for the warning signs to help keep your loved ones safe.

Bio:

Trevor is a freelance writer and recovering addict & alcoholic whose been clean and sober for over 5 years. Since his recovery began he has enjoyed using his talent for words to help spread treatment resources and addiction awareness. In his free time, you can find him working with recovering addicts or outside enjoying about any type of fitness activity imaginable.  

You can contact Trevor via LinkedIn or his website Website

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Alcohol, Caregiving, Guest Blogger

Preserving Our Legacy


The good life is one inspired by love and guided by knowledge. Bertrand Russell

2016-10-27-3I am often inspired by family caregivers who share their story; I find story sharing to be healing.  One of the reasons I started to blog about our Caregiving experience was to have an outlet to share our story.   When we share our story, there is a sense of relief that you have been heard, that your experience might be of help to someone.

Mike Stith from One Legacy has a passion for sharing inspirational stories.  Mike has helped families preserve their family legacy through story telling that he captures in a variety of ways.    Mike believes that in sharing stories, On Legacy is adding a special piece of history for future generations.  I think he is right on target with that assessment.

I did not have the opportunity to meet three of my four grandparents, however I do remember my five older siblings talking about all four of our grandparents with fond memories.  How I wish we would have been able to capture my grandparents legacy so that I would have had a better sense of my grandparents.  One Legacy is preserving family stories for future generations in a way will capture the hearts of future family generations.

Don’t just take it from me, listen in and learn how Mike Stith from One Legacy is creating Healing Ties all around us!

To learn more about One Legacy visit them on-line at http://onelegacy.com/

You can reach Mike Stith via email at mstith@onelegacy.com   Twitter https://twitter.com/one_legacy_com  Facebook https://www.facebook.com/onelegacyllc

Chris MacLellan is the author of “What’s The Deal with Caregiving” and the Host of  Healing Ties Radio

 3D1

Screen Shot 2015-11-18 at 1.18.08 PM

logo-01

2 Comments

Filed under Caregiving

Caregivers: When You Need A Lyft!


Man is free at the moment he wishes to be. Voltaire

Have you seen a car driving down the street a featuring a pink mustache on the front of the hood, or maybe resting on the front of a windshield?  Those pink mustaches would be your next LYFT,  arriving to pick you up to take you to your next destination.

Dan Trigub

Dan Trigub

While attending the Florida Council on Aging in Orlando, FL I had the opportunity to visit with Dan Trigub Strategic Account Executive at LYFT.  Dan and his team at LYFT recognize the need for Caregivers and their Caree’s to have safe and adequate transportation to help make their caregiving day just a little easier.  Transportation is one of the biggest issues family caregivers face when juggling their caree’s appointments.  I know from personal experience, finding a ride in order for Richard to go to radiation was challenging.  My time spent on the road, driving back to the house, then to the doctor’s appointments…Whew…I spent quite a bit of time on the road that no can be eliminated with a LYFT!

LYFT recognizes the need for Caregivers to have additional transportation assistance, and they are doing something about it.  Don’t just take my word for it, take it first hand from Dan.

On this episode of Healing Ties, Dan Trigub and me chat about LYFT, the  pink mustache and how LYFT can make a Caregivers day just a little lyftless stressful.  Listen in and learn how Dan and the entire staff at LYFT are creating Healing Ties all around us!   

Just as Voltaire said, “Man is free at the moment he wishes to be”  LYFT free’s up a Caregivers moment, in order to make the Caregiver’s life just a littler easier.

 

wpid-wp-1448112894007.jpegwpid-wp-1448113432219.jpeg

Chris MacLellan is the author of “What’s The Deal with Caregiving?” and the Host of Healing Ties featured on Spreaker, iTunes, iHeart and UK Health Radio.  Healing Ties and The Purple Jacket are a part of the Whole Care Network, Inc

Join us in Chicago for the 1st National Caregiving Conference hosted by Denise Brown from Caregiving.com.  Now through August 25, register to win cash prizes to help with your travel cost to the conference.   Visit our conference hub by clicking here.   Contact me direct about becoming a sponsor or exhibitor at the conference! National Caregiving Conference (1)

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Caregiving

How Can You Help Seniors Prevent Identity Theft?


We welcome back guest blogger, Maria Alice to The Purple Jacket! 

Unfortunately seniors are a popular target for identity thieves. Criminals see senior citizens as more easily influenced and assume that they have assets to plunder. As a caregiver, you can educate your seniors with tips to help prevent them from being victimized and help them out whenever possible as well. The following are some of the most valuable ways your elder loved ones can avoid identity theft.

Protect Personal Documents

Many people are in the habit of carrying around personal documents, like social security cards and insurance cards, in a purse or wallet, believing it would be safer when its on your person. However, this is not the case. It’s better to keep this personal information in a secure place at home, such as in a locked safe, just in case your senior forgets or loses their bag somewhere or it gets stolen. Additionally, make sure that all documents containing personal information or account numbers are shredded when not needed anymore as identity thieves can easily search your trash.

Avoid Phone and Door-to-Door Scams

Never give out personal information over the phone. This includes insurance numbers, social security numbers, credit card numbers and any other financial information. Instead, they should request that the information be sent in the mail or done in person. Unscrupulous door-to-door salespeople may see seniors as easy marks when it comes to selling them things they don’t need at over-inflated prices. Some examples are unnecessary insurance and home services. One popular scam involves giving a “free” inspection of the heating/cooling system and then finding “urgent repairs” that are needed.

Practice Safe Online Behavior

Make sure your loved one monitors their credit report. Many seniors don’t realize that they can monitor their credit reports online and even put a freeze on inquiries. You may be able to use a good antivirus program that is updated regularly. This will help prevent viruses on your computer that capture personal and financial information.  It is vitally important to create strong passwords and change them from time to time. Different accounts should have different passwords as having the same password for everything would help a hacker gain access to all your accounts and personal information.

Be Mindful of Home Security

Always keep doors and windows locked whether you are at home or away. Unlocked doors are an invitation to thieves. Seniors might not even know that anything is missing until they see unknown charges on their credit card bill. Make sure that your home security system is maintained, including cameras, automatic locks, and arming your house while you are away. Different houses have different necessities, so it’s important to research different websites to find one that caters to your needs.

Caregiver Responsibility

Sharing these tips will help seniors in your care avoid the heartache and hassle of being victimized. Identity theft is on the rise; our most vulnerable citizens need to be aware of the threat. Protecting personal documents, avoiding phone and email scams while being proactive about home security can weave a safety net around us. As a caregiver, your help can be instrumental in preventing senior identity theft.

Maria Alice is a freelance writer currently living in Chicago. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of Illinois at Chicago with a minor in Communication. She blogs about environmentally friendly tips, technological advancements, and healthy active lifestyles.

1 Comment

Filed under Caregiving, Guest Bloggers

Seniors Finding Energy in Self-Driving Cars


We welcome back guest blogger, Maria Alice

Autonomous, or “self-driving,” cars have been making the news rounds for a few years. These computer-controlled vehicles are capable of following a preset course when the driver is impaired or would otherwise be unable to manage the pedals and steering wheel, meaning fewer accidents. These vehicles run on electricity instead of fossil fuels, providing a host of ecological and cost-friendly benefits. These two benefits alone are merely the tip of the iceberg of benefits that self-driving cars can provide.

An automated car means that seniors and others with mobility problems or handicaps can truly share the road with the rest of the driving populace. Elders unable to drive by themselves would simply need to tell the computer where they wanted to the car to take them and then relax. Furthermore, a self-driving car does not require additional, sometimes-costly, mechanical alterations that a conventional handicap-accessible car would require to drive around unsupervised.

The main draw of a self-driving car is that all of the content between point A and point B is handled by someone else. The passenger just needs to know those two points.

When looking into the big names behind this booming industry, Audi, Baidu, BMW, Ford, Google, Mercedes and Tesla, all make appearances. Google offers two different models of self-driving car: one is a “pod” lacking either a steering wheel or pedal and the other is a modified Lexus outfitted with sensors and an on-board computer.

While you may think that this technology is being championed by the elderly, the blind and visually-handicapped will also greatly benefit from the proliferation of self-driving cars. Independence is a big merit for these people and it can do a lot for their self-esteem to know that they don’t need to ask around for a ride or hunt for just enough fare to pay a public bus or taxi. A self-driving car is the perfect means of granting that sort of independence.

The benefits of driverless cars extend beyond just people – the environment gains a huge boon as well. According to Energy Companies Alberta, full integration of electric driverless cars would reduce fossil fuel consumption by nearly 3 billion gallons between relying on electricity, running the vehicle at a sustained speed, and streamlining traffic on busy highways. While electrical self-driving cars would not eliminate fossil fuel usage entirely, the technology could eventually be reworked to handle other industries that involve automotive devices, like the shipping industry.

While all of this information may sound wonderful, the reality is mired in legal quicksand. One speed bump on the road to automotive modernization and the disabled comes from the legal requirements for operating a vehicle. Most states and federal districts have laws on the books which dictate that a driver must be in full control of the vehicle at all times. This means that while driverless cars can be put into the marketplace, a designated driver must still remain within the vehicle as long as it is on the road.

Do we think self-driving cars are a worthy endeavor? Does the idea of giving your parents the freedoms they used to enjoy appeal to you, especially when several major automotive and technology industries are looking into them? Would you rest better not having to include time spent driving them around into your schedule? Do you care about renewable energy and the future of the planet’s health? The short answer to these questions is “yes.” All research points to driverless cars becoming common enough that the gas-guzzling auto will be a relic of the past and will greatly loosen our reliance upon technology that requires fossil fuels to operate.

Maria Alice  is a freelance writer currently living in Chicago. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of Illinois at Chicago with a minor in Communication. She blogs about environmentally friendly tips, technological advancements, and healthy active lifestyles.

Leave a comment

Filed under Guest Bloggers

Home Safety Tips for Seniors


We welcome back one of our favorite guest bloggers, Maria Alice, to The Purple Jacket!

We all value our independence and autonomy, both of which are threatened as a person gets older. It’s always better for an elderly person to continue to live in their own home, in familiar surroundings, where they are comfortable. For the majority of the elderly, this arrangement is possible with the right support. In today’s world, safety and home monitoring are easier than ever before.

Home Security

One of the best ways to keep your elderly loved one safe is to have a home security system installed. You can find more information and great resources about different kinds of systems here. The benefit is two-fold: this gives your elderly family member a way to signal if there is a medical emergency, and it also provides protection from outside threats. It’s not pleasant to consider that elderly people living alone might be targets of crime, but unfortunately criminals prey on those least able to defend themselves.

Safety in the Bathroom

The bathroom can be a hazard for older people, whose vision and balance will most likely not be as good as it once was. Slipping in the tub and falling is a common source of injury in the elderly and can have tragic results, especially for those who live alone. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one out of every five falls among the elderly leads to broken bones or a head injury. Steps can be taken to minimize risk, such as installing a step-in shower or adding a slip-proof surface to the bottom of the tub. Handrails can also be a major help to senior citizens and should be installed next to the toilet and in the shower.

Lighting and Clutter

Memory and mental function are often impaired in older people, especially those in the early stages of dementia. Sufficient lighting can make a big difference in preventing accidents, as can keeping the home clear of obstacles. The old saying, “a place for everything and everything in its place” was never more appropriate than when describing the kind of environment an elderly person needs. As memory fades, it’s more important than ever for everyday necessities to be within reach and in a familiar place.

Home Hazards

Anything that poses a threat to the safety of your loved one should be put away or safety-proofed. Sharp knives may need to be removed from the kitchen. Hazardous corners should be covered with plastic bumpers. Make sure that there is a clear path to follow from one room to another throughout the house, since the risk of falling increases with age.

Carbon Monoxide and Fire Alarms

Besides a security system, carbon monoxide and fire alarms are two other ways that modern technology can help keep your elderly parent or loved one safe. Because memory in seniors can decrease, there is always the possibility they may turn on an appliance and then forget about it. It is also difficult to determine that there is carbon monoxide in your home without an alarm so it is important to have one installed and checked regularly.

Road Map to Independence

Taking these steps will increase the likelihood of an elderly individual living a safe and happy life in their own home. A security system will provide health and safety monitoring, and modifications to the bathroom can have a great impact on an elderly person’s mobility and independence.

Securing the environment from hazards by providing plenty of lighting and eliminating clutter are first steps toward creating a safe home. And of course, every home should have carbon monoxide and fire alarms to protect the people inside. With these steps, you can provide your elderly loved one with the independence and satisfaction that comes from continuing to live in their own home.

Maria Alice is a freelance writer currently living in Chicago. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of Illinois at Chicago with a minor in Communication. She blogs about environmentally friendly tips, technological advancements, and healthy active lifestyles.

2 Comments

Filed under Caregiving, Guest Blogger, Guest Bloggers

If She Had Lived to 100


Be happy. It’s one way of being wise. Sidonie Gabrielle Colette

Today, my Mother would have turned 100, unfortunately, she missed being a centenarian by just under 31 years!  Born in 1915 in New Orléans, my Mother was a women before her time.  Obtaining two college degree’s in the late 1930’s, she was talented and always seemed to be the “bell of the ball.”  Yet she passed away in 1984, just before her 69th birthday with seemingly, many unfulfilled dreams.

The MacLellan Six: Merrille, Mary, JoAnn, Jim, Gerri and Chris

The MacLellan Six: Merrille, Mary, JoAnn, Jim, Gerri and Chris

While “Gramma Bell”  got to know all of her 25 grandchildren, she missed out on getting to know all of her great-grandchildren which now reach past the number 40.  She missed out seeing the success of her six children, four of which have lived longer than her.  How medicine has changed over the years. But most of all later in life, she missed out on being happy, which is the saddest of them all.

1230082_10201224238681048_284042414_n (1)

Family Reunion 2013

I’m sure raising kids in the 40’s and 50’s was challenging, just as it is today.  Yet it is important to note that she loved being a mother, but being a mother kept her from fulfilling some of her dreams.  There are so many things in life we give up when we care for someone else, albeit a parent or a caregiver.

I’ve never been a parent, but I do know what it is like to be a Caregiver.  I sense there is quite a bet of similar traits in these two roles, most notably the ability to love and care for someone else.  Sure, I realize that some parents do not have the ability to love and care for their children, just as I realize that there are IMG_2082many Caregivers who are out there who do not love their Caree: I call those folks, “Caregivers By Default.”  But when you get right down to it, we all have the innate ability to care, it just  has to be nurtured.  I’m thankful for that I received the care gene from my Mom, I am mindful that life moves on, and it is better to move on in happiness, than in worrying about the past.

Happy 100th birthday “Gramma Bell,” we are all just doing fine!

Chris MacLellan is a radio show host and Author of “What’s The Deal With Caregiving”

Available on Amazon by clicking here

3D1

1 Comment

Filed under Caregiving

Senior Friendly Communities


Join us this Wednesday June 10th at 7:00 pm (EDT) on Health Cafe LIVE for another episode of Healing Ties Radio from The Bow Tie Guy as we visit with Tami Neumann and Cathy Braxton from Silver Dawn Senior Friendly Communities. Tami and Cathy are training Communities, Health Care Facilities and Businesses across the nation on how to become Senior Friendly! With an aging society on the horizon, Silver Dawn Senior Friendly Cities is a concept that challenges us to pro-actively prepare for change in our current demographics while promoting good health and independence for seniors. There is much more to this story! Listen in and learn how Tami and Cathy are creating Healing Ties all around us! Cannot listen live…No Worries!! Healing Ties is available on demand at iHeart Radio and now on UK Health Radio!

Senior_Friendly_Cities_Healing_Ties_6_10_2015

 

_BowTieCover.medium

Leave a comment

Filed under Healing Ties Radio Show