Tag Archives: The Purple Jacket

Dementia Care: Filling the Role of Spouse and Caregiver


The Purple Jacket is pleased to welcome back guest writer, Samantha Stein from ALTCP.org. 

Dementia care is difficult because of all the changes the care recipient goes through. No amount of money or precaution can fully prepare families for when dementia strikes a loved one, and this reality is even more devastating for many couples. To illustrate, here is a video we came across online of Bob Treanor and his wife, Ruth. Bob provides valuable insight on what it is like for individuals to become dementia caregivers to their spouses.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OEcgUNwwFto

Dementia affects the lives of many individuals. And as the video shows, it certainly does not only take its toll on the diagnosed. It also alters the lives of the people closest to the patient.

For this week’s post, let us discuss all of the intricacies of dementia and what caregivers go through for their family members and loved ones going through it.

Dementia Explained

Before anything else, let us clarify one common misconception: dementia is not a disease. It is the term used to refer to the severe decline in memory or thinking ability that it hinders a person from accomplishing everyday tasks. These signs and symptoms vary, but the most common ones are as follows:

  • Memory Loss
  • Difficulty in language and communication
  • Change in Attention Span
  • Reasoning and Judgment
  • Visual Perception
  • Behavioral Changes

Another misconception that people have is that dementia and Alzheimer’s disease are the same. However, the latter is, in fact, a type of dementia. The other types are listed below:

  • Vascular dementia
  • Dementia with Lewy bodies
  • Mixed dementia
  • Frontotemporal dementia
  • Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
  • Normal pressure hydrocephalus
  • Huntington’s disease
  • Wernicke-Karsakoff Syndrome

Dementia Caregiving Statistics

While it may depend on the type of care that they provide, caregivers often put themselves at a great risk by taking on the responsibility of supporting their loved ones. We have all heard the stories about it; co-workers barely meeting deadlines because of caregiving duties, people have even left their jobs to fulfill the role full-time, or neighbors leaving their homes to move in with loved ones. It is not an easy feat and it requires more dedication than anyone can ever really understand.

Dementia caregivers are no stranger to this circumstance. In a study released by the Alzheimer’s Association, more than 15 million family members and friends have provided 18.1 billion hours of unpaid care to loved ones with Alzheimer’s and other dementia in 2015. The economic value of all this was worth over $221 billion. Moreover, 38-percent of dementia caregivers have shared that they have been doing the work for six years or more. When a person takes on a responsibility this big and it lasts this long, it is bound to have negative effects on his or her well-being.

As cited in the same study, caregivers to dementia care recipients are 3.5 times more likely to say that the greatest consequence of the task is that it creates or aggravates their own health problems. Inevitably, these caregivers do not get to walk away from the experience unscathed. Physically, emotionally, financially, socially, or mentally, dementia caregivers will have to face some type of health problem during or after the care.

Lastly, and perhaps the most devastating discovery is that people caring for their loved ones hospitalized for dementia are more likely to pass away the following year, even after accounting for the spousal caregiver’s age.

Gender Differences in Caregiving to a Spouse with Dementia

Traditionally, caregiving is perceived by the majority as a woman’s task. This may be because of her nurturing nature or because of the traditional gender roles in society. However, the perception and behavior of society is rapidly changing. As seen in Bob and Ruth’s story, men are also becoming increasingly open to caregiving.

Gender Differences in Caregiving among Family – Caregivers of People with Mental Illness, a study published last year, attributes the growing change to longer life spans, more women taking on jobs outside the home, and smaller families. Similar to the reasons that women have in assuming the role of caregivers, men are driven to assume the responsibility by a sense of affection, commitment, and family responsibility.

Unfortunately, research that focuses on this subject is still quite limited. Most studies still pay little attention to male caregivers and maintain focus their female counterparts.

couple(Photo Credit: Pixabay)

Redefining Marriage

Marriages take the biggest hit when it comes to dementia. Perhaps, this is might be one of the biggest tests to “in sickness and in health.” Imagine slowly watching partner forget about a life that you had built together over the decades. Not only that, imagine feeling angry at the whole situation and wishing it was all over, then immediately being consumed by the overwhelming guilt of even entertaining the thought. This is the reality that many dementia caregivers face on a regular basis.

Physically present, but psychologically absent—this is how Pauline Boss Ph.D. describes how spouses can change when dementia takes over in her NextAvenue article entitled, For Caregivers of Spouse with Dementia, a Redefinition of Marriage. For many spousal caregivers, dementia has turned their married lives into an abstract relationship that feels like “living with a stranger” or “loving half a person.” It is no longer about building and maintaining a perfect relationship. As Boss puts it, it becomes pushing to make the relationship good enough.

We get a further look into this through John R. Smith’s How to Care for a Spouse with Early-Onset Alzheimer’s. Just in his early 40s, he has become the primary caregiver of his wife whose health condition is so advanced that she has lost the ability to brush her teeth, bathe, or even remember his name.

One striking point in his account is how spousal caregivers will feel a unique kind of isolation. When your spouse could barely remember your name, how can he or she truly give consent to intimacy? Despite it being a taboo in some social circles, sex is one of the most basic needs of a human being. Dementia can and will take that away in marriages because, as Smith’s therapist puts it, it will start to feel like date rape.

The Importance of Self-Care

In the chaos, success, and emotional turmoil that come with caregiving for a spouse with dementia, caregivers can easily neglect their own lives. In their minds, their spouse’s needs become the primary concern. However, prioritizing their own care concerns and needs is and will always be important, and they should not feel guilty for it.

Spousal caregivers, especially those handling cases as consuming as dementia in their own homes, can feel as if anything that takes their time and attention away from their spouse is not worth the thought. In some cases, taking a break could even feel as if their being selfish and spending the money on anything that they want feels like a substantial waste of limited resources.

But taking care of themselves does matter immensely. In Smith’s case, he stopped eating properly because he dedicated most of his time and their resources caring for his wife. He ended up losing weight, and every time his wife would stumble and fall, he would have trouble picking her up.

Your Concerns and Emotions are Valid

It has been said countless times before, but let’s reiterate: the quality of your care depends on how much you care for yourself. To the caregiver reading this, your health matter just as much as your spouse’s, so take the time to safeguard it.

As stated above, most caregivers learn later on that their own health concerns are aggravated by the responsibility of caring for their spouses. Stop, and reevaluate if you have enough saved away for that. The different types of long term care facilities may vary in prices, but none of them come cheap. Bear in mind that preparing yourself for the long term care costs you might have to face is all right.

Also, taking the time to continue doing what you love to do is not just acceptable but necessary. Maintaining good health by eating right (even if it is a little more expensive) and exercising can help you handle caregiving so much easier. Keeping your mind and your body in shape will make you a more effective caregiver. A strong body will help you handle the physical demands of caregiving, whether it is heavy lifting or working longer hours. A sound mind will help you handle the emotional roller coaster that come with it.

Lastly, but just as vital, remember that it is okay to ask for help. You are human. Exhaustion and frustration will come, and there will be times when you feel like you are filled to the brim. When this happens, know that those emotions are valid and that they do not make you a horrible spouse. Just ask for help from the people you trust the most. It may be from your children, other family members or even your neighbors. If budget permits it, the help might even come from a hired extra pair of hands.

Author Bio:

Samantha Stein is an online content manager for ALTCP.org. Her works focus on key information on long term care insurance, finance, elder care, and retirement. In line with the organization’s goal, Samantha creates content that helps raise awareness on the importance of having a comprehensive long-term care insurance plan not just for the good of the individual but for the safety of the entire family.

 

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We’ve Only Just Begun: White Flowers and Green Shoes


Fond memory brings the light of other days around me. Thomas Moore

For some reason, I have been thinking  of Karen Carpenter’s popular song, “We’ve Only Just Begun”…

We’ve only just begun to live
White lace and promises
A kiss for luck and we’re on our way
(We’ve only begun)

While “white lace and promises” are great…I wonder what the song would sound like if I changedwp-1489778736321.jpg those lyrics to White Flowers and Green Shoes? (probably not!) Well, I don’t think song writer Michael Williams has anything to worry about in regards to me, or anyone else for for that matter,  changing the lyrics to one of the most iconic songs of our time.  As many times as I have heard this song over the years, it wasn’t until recently that the song presented a different meaning to me after a white flower appeared in my life.

Before the risin’ sun, we fly
So many roads to choose
We’ll start out walkin’ and learn to run
(And yes, we’ve just begun)

So many roads to choose. I have debated long and hard about sharing this story with my readers on “The Purple Jacket” but have come to the conclusion that since our life has been an open book, this experience would be important to share with everyone who has followed our story.

A few months ago one of my longest and best friends said to me; “you have so many wonderful things happening in your life right now, have you ever considered going for a psychic reading?”   My theological background was skeptical, but I was open to the experience.

The experience was more than I could have ever imagined. From my past and present life, to future romance, to business success, every topic was touched without me really saying a word. It was amazing what someone knew about me, who did not know me at all!

Then we moved onto the topic of Richard…

“Richard wants you to know that he has made it to the other side.”

“He’s checking in on you, but spending lots of time in Paris visiting friends” (Richard loved Paris and he and Herman traveled to Paris six times)

“You’ll see a flower, a white flower, I’m not sure what kind of flower, but I know that the flower will be white.  I don’t know when the flower will appear, when you see the flower, that will be Richard telling you that he is okay, that he is with you, encouraging you, wanting to live your life to the fullest and that he will always be with you.”

an-american-in-paris-limited-edition-official-opening-night-playbill-3Two nights later, I attended the spectacular musical “An American In Paris” at The Fox Theater in St. Louis.  Thirty minutes into the performance,  one of the actors walked out on stage with… a white flower!     Yes, my jaw dropped!

There is really no explanation for this phenomenon.  Chance event?  Richard and his love for Paris?  The white flower appearing in a stage play about Paris?  The psychic didn’t know I was going to see that play two days after seeing her.

I’ve shared this story with a couple of trusted friends and now I am sharing it with you. Whether you are an ardent advocate for psychic readings, you do it for fun,  have never done it before, or abhor the thought of psychic readings, seeing the white flower in “An American In Paris” has changed me forever.

And when the evening comes, we smile
So much of life ahead
We’ll find a place where there’s room to grow
(And yes, we’ve just begun)

So much of life ahead: starts with me accepting, liking and loving myself which makes me happy, joyous and free.  This allows me not to worry about what other think of of me, allows me to stop being a people pleaser, brush resentment and anger aside, forgive every single person who has harmed me, while staying in the present to live happily, joyously and free.

Sharing horizons that are new to us
Watching the signs along the way
Talkin’ it over, just the two of us
Workin’ together day to day
Together
Together

And when the evening comes, we smile
So much of life ahead
We’ll find a place where there’s room to grow
(And yes, we’ve just begun)

So much of life ahead: starts with me accepting, liking and loving myself which makes me happy, joyous and free.  This allows me not to worry about what other think of of me, allows me to stop being a people pleaser, brush resentment and anger aside, forgive every single person who has harmed me, while staying in the present to live happily, joyously and free.

Sharing horizons that are new to us
Watching the signs along the way
Talkin’ it over, just the two of us
Workin’ together day to day
Together
Together

Sharing horizons that are new to us:  When we are open to new possibilities, our life is full of new horizons.  No matter what side of the aisle you are on in this conversation, the mere fact that a total stranger said to me, “He wants you to know that he’s made it to the other side” opened up new horizons for me.  This experience helped me get to the other side of my grief. This does not mean I miss him any less, this simply means that I am at peace.  My faith tells me that I will see him again; my mind tells me he is forever pain free; my heart tells me he is standing right beside me.

And when the evening comes, we smile
So much of life ahead
We’ll find a place where there’s room to grow
And yes, we’ve just begun

Songwriters
NICHOLS, WILLIAMS

And yes, we’ve just begun:   It’s never too late to start over; it’s never too late to live your dream; it’s never too late to find peace and happiness.   It’s never too late to find your white flower in the midst of a thing called life after caregiving ends.  Now, for me:  when the evening comes, we smile. 

Here are some simple reminders to help support you during your caregiving journey: 

  • Try not to isolate yourself from others
  • Asking for help is a sign of strength, not a sign of weakness
  • Set a daily intention for yourself
  • It’s Okay to admit that caregiving can be difficult
  • Remember to take care of yourself, too!
  • Share your horizons

I used to wish for visiting hours in heaven and then my good friend Sam said to me: “There wp-1489779515429.jpgare! Every time you have a memory of Richard. Every time you cry. Every time you laugh, Richard is right there with you.” Something tells me that Richard is up there, holding a white flower too

Oh and those green shoes you were wondering about? Those green shoes are Richard’s size 7 that he wore once a year on St. Patrick’s day for over 30 years.  White flowers and green shoes…find your keepsake memory.

Read more: The Carpenters – We’ve Only Just Begun Lyrics | MetroLyrics

 

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A Birthday Gift: Introducing TLO Travel and Tours.


Wherever you go, go with all your heart. Confucius

Richard would have celebrated  his 86th birthday today, (January 24th) and I think it is fitting to formally announce my new endeavor in his honor, TLO Travel and Tours!  For those who have been reading my blog since Richard was diagnosed with esophageal cancer will know that TLO was the fun-loving acronym I used in my blog posts to describe him when writing about our caregiving journey.  TLO simply means, “The Little One” …remember, Richard stood a foot shorter than me!   Richard loved to be called TLO, and Richard loved to travel.

wp-1454002775318.jpgAs I continue to advocate for family caregivers and for those like myself, whose caregiving journey has ended, I wanted to find an opportunity that celebrates our love, care and commitment in all shapes and forms in a way that is unique.   During our eleven years together, we spent time cruising in Europe and traveling by car and plane throughout our beautiful country.  TLO Travel and Tours is not only dedicated to Richard, but to all current, past and future caregivers and their caree’s. Traveling with your caree may not be as impossible as you might think.

I can imagine that many of my caregiving friends are thinking…”Travel with my caree…how can I do that?”  Well, let me tell you about a wonderful proAccessable travelgram called Special Needs At Sea.  I learned about Special Needs at Sea when Richard and I were booking a cruise in January of 2014. Special Needs At Sea can provide you will just about any durable medical product, from oxygen to a hoyer lift and most importantly, a scooter to help make transportation easy on any cruise ship for your caree.  Special Needs At Sea can deliver the product to your stateroom, your hotel room and even your home.  Special Needs At Sea is located in Fort Lauderdale and available in over 150 ports world-wide.  As a certified Accessible Travel Advocate, I can help arrange all your durable medical equipment needs with our friends at Special Needs At Sea.

What’s ahead for TLO Travel and Tours?  We have group cruises on the horizon, four international train tours planned through 2020 including, The Canadian Rockies, Italy, the United Kingdom, and a very special Passion Play tour in 2020.  Through my association with Travel Planners International, I have access to all the best rates for land, air and sea travel that you would see on any travel website.   As we grow into the travel business, TLO Travel and Tours will focus on group tours for current and former family caregivers, retreats to re-energize, while engaging organizations to bring their conferences and workshops aboard a cruise ship or a retreat center.

TLO Travel and Tours is pleased to announce our association with Hope Love Company. Hope Loves Company (HLC) is the only non-profit in the U.S. with the mission of providing educational and emotional support to children and young adults who had or have a loved one battl2017-01-23ing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s. TLO Travel and Tours is the preferred Travel Company of Hope Loves Company as this wonderful organization travels to Iceland in the summer of 2017 for a terrific international camp for kids who care for their parents with ALS.  To learn more about Hope Loves Company, be sure to visit their website Hope Loves Company (HLC)  and listen to my podcast with Jodi O’Donnell-Ames, Executive Director of Hope Loves Company.   [/audio

Richard and I were fortunate to not only spend 11  wonderful years together., but to spend quite a bit of time traveling as well.  Whether it was sporting our Bow Ties on a formal night on our cruise, dining in the French Alps, or just hanging out together, we always found something to do together.  Making travel easy for those we love and care for is possible.

 This is an exciting time for me as I continue to grow my Whole Care Network brand with new radio shows, individual and corporate training events and now travel and tours.  Our new TLO Travel and Tours website is now live, but still in the development stages.  You can visit the travel website by simply clicking here!

When caregiving ends, its not surprising that we find our self lost and picking up the pieces of a life that was left behind.   That has been me for quite some.  I started to turn the corner with my grief about six months ago which means, I don’t miss him any less, I can now be present to myself and move on with my head held high.  Now, my next challenge is to step outside my comfort zone and get back to things that I am passionate about…travel and advocacy equals passion for me!

Welcome to TLO Travel and Tours, part of the Whole Care Network!  Feel free to contact me direct at chris@tlotravelandtours.com

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Dementia Patients at Home: Care Taker’s Guide


The Purple Jacket welcomes back guest blogger Andrea Bell 

Dementia Patients at Home: Care Taker’s Guide

According to the behaviorist perspective, the environment plays a key role in how people behave. The impact comes from the people as well the type of house or even inanimate objects that are placed there. Dementia is not a disease in which a patient can admit himself into a hospital and receive proper treatment. He has to live with it for the rest of his/her life. Since they cannot control the progression of the disease, what they can control is to choose the way they want to spend their remaining years. Home décor can have a significant impact on dementia patients who are receiving care at home. It is important to understand that their life has or is beginning to change drastically, so a change in surroundings to help them adapt better is necessary. Here are some absolutely easy home décor ideas especially for people with Dementia:

  1. Bedding and comfort

Every patient (Dementia or not) needs comfort. Bedding, chairs and sofas should all be soft and cozy enough for the patient to stay in. Discomfort can stress the patient very easily which can increase the adverse effects of the disease. Comfort is also provided through emotional support of the care taker, it is necessary to educate yourself about Dementia patients before taking care of them. Their mattresses should have a plastic covering as well as be fire retardant.

Here are some pages to get you started: How to properly deal with Dementia; Dementia nursing and caring tips.

  1. When Nature calls

Most patients with mild cognitive impairment or even normal physical weaknesses tend to wet their beds. It is absolutely essential to stay absolutely calm as it is already a pretty shameful moment for them. To avoid this, adult diapers and catheters are necessary. Other than this, easy to use bathroom fixtures and fittings are something that can provide the patients and their care takers both, some ease. Also, there are several kinds of bath chairs with all proper washing functions available which can be placed in the bathroom. Get them here.

  1. Reminders and forgetfulness

Dementia is probably the second name for forgetfulness. It can make the patient feel useless, as they at some point are not able to remember important pieces of information, or even the insignificant things like names of different foods or what day it is today. So to help them remember the house should be ‘reminder friendly’ in ways that the patient is instantly reminded of basic things. Sticky Notes always come in handy, even for everyday life. Post them everywhere, especially near the bedside or work areas with whatever information that you choose to remind them.

Large reminder boards can be placed on the wall, or the fridge, which can keep track of things like what time do they have to take their medicine, or how many times or pills do they have to take etc. If it is someone’s special day, like a birthday or a wedding anniversary, it can be easily posted on the reminder board in bold letters, which can allow the patient to be reminded of it every time they look at it or walk by it. You can easily by them from this store.

Bold analogue wall clocks can also be a good way for the patients to keep track of time. Large clocks with bold calendars are also available especially for dementia patients. Get them here.

  1. Way finding and wandering

A smart way to stop the patient from wandering is to plant or paste arrows inside the house, or in the backyard to allow the patient to recognize where he has to go. As soon as he begins to wander, the arrows will prompt him with the path that needs to be followed.

  1. Color selection for the eyes

With Dementia in old age, many patients may develop blindness or cataract eventually leading lives with blurry vision. Usage of bright and bold colors in things that need to be highlighted such as their pill boxes or their food containers can help them locate and even remember it easily. On the other hand, for areas such as those meant for sleeping and relaxing, the colors should be light and pastel in order to provide a soothing effect for the patient. These bold and soothing colors can be integrated into walls, curtains, bed sheets as well as the carpets on the floor.

  1. Organization to reduce confusion

Old age can cause a lot of confusion for the patient, especially if it is accompanied by Dementia. To reduce daily life confusion as much as possible, you can color coordinate their wardrobes, or pre pick out their clothes that they have to wear daily. Arrange their personal belongings or toiletries in a way that they are clear and visible right in front.

Andrea Bell is  freelance writer by day and sports fan by night.  Andrea writes about tech education and health related issues (but not at the same time). Live simply, give generously, watch football and a technology lover. Find Andrea  on twitter @IM_AndreaBell.

(All content and links submitted in this post are written and submitted by Andrea Bell.)

 

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Caregivers: This Week on ‘Be A Healthy Caregiver’


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 Tuesday at 1:00 pm (EST) ‘Sink Your Teeth into Dental Hygiene’ with America’s Dental Hygienist Shirley Gutkowski.

To listen to Tuesday’s show live, simply click here! 

BTR pix cropped copy

America’s Dental Hygienist, Shirley Gutkowski

Thursday at 8:00 pm (EST) ‘The Sandwich Generation’ with best-selling  author Sherri Snelling. 

To listen to Thursday’s show live, simply click here!

Purple Suit from J Jacquez

From the Caregiving Club, Author Sherri Snelling

Listen to

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Tuesday’s at 1:00 pm & Thursday’s at 8:00 pm.  All our episodes of ‘Be A Healthy Caregiver’  are archived for your listening convenience by clicking here!

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A Conversation About Our Cargiving Cruise


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On Tuesday’s ‘Be A Healthy Caregiver’ show, I visited with Denise Brown on Caregiving.com  to discuss our upcoming Caregiving Cruise on the Norwegian Sky leaving out of Miami, Florida on November 11, 2013.   You can listen to our show by clicking here

No, this isn’t me or Denise, . But they sure look happy frolicking in the ocean in the Bahamas. We will, too!

No, this isn’t me or Denise, But they sure look happy frolicking in the ocean in the Bahamas. We will, too!

Denise  and I spoke about our goals for the cruise: To connect you with others who understand Caregiving, to have fun and to relax. We’re thrilled to be able to offer this opportunity to cruise with you. We’ve got a special price for our cruise, which includes the cost of the cruise, a one-hour cocktail party and three one-hour workshops. To make sure we keep this special rate, book your cruise by March 15.  

Have a special need?  Our travel agent (and expert) Jerry Dismaris is a Certified Travel Advocate and will be able to work with you to meet all of your special needs. Jerry will also be able to help with transportation to Miami.  He is a full-serve cruise agent!

To learn more about our cruise and to book your reservation, click here 

To go directly to booking, click here

We Might Have Cancer…

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...But Cancer Does Not Have Us! 

 

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‘Be A Healthy Caregiver’ on Blog Talk Radio


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On Tuesday February 26th  at 1:00 pm,  we welcome  Denise Brown  from  Caregiving.com  to  our ‘Be A Healthy Caregiver’ show on Blog Talk Radio .

The Purple Jacket Highly recommends Caregiving.com

The Purple Jacket Highly recommends Caregiving.com

On Tuesday’s  show, not only will we be talking with one of the leading Caregiving experts in the country, we will be sharing some exciting news about our upcoming Caregiving cruise in November of 2013.  For more information on our Caregiving Cruise, simply click here. 

Our show is available live at 1:00 pm with optional chat room for you to ask questions to our guest. (Our show is archived so you can listen at your  convenience.) To access our show, simply click  here.

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 To access all our ‘Be A Healthy Caregiver’ episodes on

blogtalkradiologo Simply click here

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Filed under Be A Healthy Caregiver, Blog Talk Radio, Bow Tie Guy, Caregiving Cruise

‘Be A Healthy Caregiver’ on Blog Talk Radio Every Tuesday at 1:00pm


Blog Talk RadioJoin us this Tuesday, December 18th at 1:00pm for ‘Be A Healthy Caregiver’ on Blog Talk Radio with our special guest, acclaimed Caregiving author,  Rob Harris.   You can listen live on Tuesday or at a time that is convenient for you by simply clicking here 

Rob’s book, We’re In This Together: A Caregiver’s Story and the 70 Caregiving Tips that he included, has been a #1 Amazon.com bestseller in the Physicians & Patient Caregiver category. Celebrities, the media, and some of the leading oncologists, surgeons and doctors in the United States and abroad have praised it. Excerpts of his book, along with many of his Caregiver Tips will soon appear in one of the nation’s leading magazines and websites: Coping With Cancer.

robharrismuralHis book has inspired many, including two songwriters that produced a song and had it recorded by an up-and-coming recording artist. The song, We’re In This Together, will be made available in the near future.

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Rob enjoys writing, blogging, and speaking in front of audiences, but gets the most pleasure from helping caregivers, patients, and those within the medical community. In whatever free time remains, he enjoys visiting with family, friends, and spending time at the beach.

If you would like to be a guest on ‘Be A Healthy Caregiver’ contact me direct at Chris@thepurplejacket.com

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Filed under Be A Healthy Caregiver, Blog Talk Radio, Bow Tie Guy, caregiver, Caregiving, Chemotherapy

Progressive Holiday Blog Party with Caregiving.com


The Purple Jacket Highly and The Bow Tie Guy highly recommends Caregiving.com

The Purple Jacket and The Bow Tie Guy highly recommends Caregiving.com

The Purple Jacket is pleased to take part in this year’s Progressive Holiday Blog Party with the wonderful members of Caregiving.com.  The Community at Caregiving.com  is like having an extended family;  I am proud to be a part of this wonderful group!

For those first time visitors to ‘The Purple Jacket’ welcome and Thank You for stopping by!  I blog about my Caregiving SONY DSCexperience for my partner, who I loving refer to as ‘The Little One.’  He was diagnosed with esophagus cancer in August of 2011.  Given three to four months to live, he has outlived all predictions.  While each one of us deals with the reality of cancer in a different way, each one of us wants to look on the bright side of life. Yesterday is gone, today is here, not sure about tomorrow. It is our hope that lets us withstand problems; it is our beliefs that let us find solutions.

To learn more about me,  I invite you to visit my ‘about page’ on my website by clicking here.

My Blog Talk Radio Show, Be A Healthy Caregiver’  airs every Tuesday at Blog Talk Radio1:00 pm.  If you would like to be a guest on the show, please contact me at Chirs@thepurplejacket.com

Currently I am the coördinator of Senior Services with SunServe Social Services in Wilton Manors, FL.SunServe logo deb  I am also an M.A. Candidate attending Gonzaga University studying Leadership and Communication .

Remember…We Might Have Cancer…But Cancer Does Not Have Us!

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Filed under advocacy, Advocate, Be A Healthy Caregiver, Caregiving, LGBT Caregiving, LGBT Couples, LGBT Seniors