After Caregiving Ends


Being deeply loved by someone gives you strength, while loving someone deeply gives you courage. Lao Tzu

March 9th! This day comes around every year and there is no way to avoid it. Sure, I could roll the covers over my head for the entire day and wallow in sadness, but what does that accomplish; more sadness, more isolation? I think not!

As I look back on these last four years, I see quite a bit of change in all facets of my life. There is the weight loss, the new moustache, establishing The Whole Care Network and TLO Cruises and Tours and of all things getting a tattoo!

 

The tattoo is probably the most outlandish thing I have ever done in my entire life, however the tattoo has so much meaning to me as I ACE, (After Caregiving Ends). I believe it is through the experience of the white flower and tattoo which has allowed me to work through my grief and (If you would like to learn more about the tattoo see my post entitled “We’ve Only Just Begun: White Flowers and Green Shoes by clicking here“) guide me on a peaceful path.

When Richard (aka TLO) made his life transition on March 9, 2104, two lives were forever changed. As I look back on what I wrote the three previous years on March 9, there is one constant theme, love endures. What is different for me on March 9, 2018 is that I have started to live life again and break out of my isolation.

As I wrote in “What’s The Deal With Caregiving” I believe there are four stages of grief that caregivers experience:

  1. Relief < caregiving has come to an end and the one you are caregiving is now pain-free
  2. Sadness < the life that you once knew is forever changed
  3. Guilt < when you realise that you move on with your life without the one you love
  4. Acceptance < that day when you wake up and say to yourself…”Job well done” and you’re ready to move on with your life with your head held hight.

It took me 15 months to get to the point when I could get to acceptance. What I realize this past year is that I left out one important stage in grief, taking…

5. Action < Moving from isolation and activate your hopes, dreams and desires.

Whether it was the experience of the while flower, the tattoo, starting the Whole Care Network, (I could use countless examples from this past year) these experiences that happened over the past 12 months made me realize that until I took action, I was going to continue to isolate myself and stay stuck in my own muck (Richard would be most displeased!). Taking action has not only has restored my confidence, taking action has allowed me step outside my comfort zone which has provided exciting opportunities for personal growth and fulfilment.

What I have learned along the way is just as caregiving is different for each one of us, life after caregiving is going to be different for each one of us too. Now four years past, I don’t miss him any less; I’ve learned to live with him, and the love, care and commitment we had for each other, in a different way.

It’s “funny” how taking action has allowed me to find deeper meaning to our love, care and commitment. I will be interested to see what March 9, 2019 brings to me on The Purple Jacket!

 

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How to Best Communicate With Someone Who Has Alzheimer’s


If someone you know or care about has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, you are probably already preparing for the ways your relationship will change. Alzheimer’s disease, as defined by Psychology Today, is a progressive, neurocognitive disease characterized by memory loss, language deterioration, impaired ability to mentally manipulate visual information, poor judgment, confusion, restlessness, and mood swings. It is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly.

With these symptoms impacting your relationship with the person afflicted, you will benefit to know how to best communicate with someone who has Alzheimer’s.

Effects on Communication at Different Stages

The stage at which someone’s illness has progressed may impact your best tactic for communication. Alzheimer’s disease facts outline the stages by which communication is affected.

In the early onset of the disease, the person may find it difficult to say the right words and will use familiar words repeatedly, even describing objects because they cannot recall the words they aim to speak. Speech challenge progressions will include losing train of thought easily and difficulty forming a coherent sentence.

If the patient is multi-lingual, they may also start speaking their birth language. An Alzheimer’s disease fact is that the patient may speak less often and rely on gestures instead of speech. One of the perplexing attributes of the disease is how differently it affects each person.

Be Patient

In most early stage patients with Alzheimer’s, they will have the ability to communicate with others. You should make every attempt to maintain conversation, just with more patience. Still look at your friend or family member directly and in the eye when speaking to them, and wait for their response. Try to refrain from jumping in while they are talking as they may take longer to form and articulate their thought and you could throw off their answer. Make your conversation reciprocal, asking questions to continue the dialogue.

As their Alzheimer’s disease progresses, it is possible that with the aforementioned changes in speech, their stories may present as incoherent or unlikely to be realistic. It is still best that you help them to continue the conversation. Don’t be argumentative, even if you know the story they are sharing isn’t theirs, they are calling you by the wrong name, or other common communication challenges.

Alzheimer’s disease facts outline that the patient may develop delusions (false beliefs despite a lack of evidence of truth) and hallucinations (like a waking dream without outward stimuli) in their current or recall. Caring.com outlines that the patient doesn’t realize that the memories or stories they are sharing aren’t true. They are not lying, they are victim to the effects of their disease.

Ask How the Person Prefers to Communicate

The experts at Alzheimers.org suggest learning how the patient prefers to communicate. As they may themselves grow frustrated with the challenges of speech, they may prefer to talk over the phone rather than in person, or be most at ease communicating via text or email.

It is beneficial to the patient to continue to communicate in any form. By trying to speak, recall words and stories, their brains are remaining active.

Triumphs in speech can also have a positive emotional response for the patient. Reports have shown that remaining socially and cognitively active may help build the cognitive reserve of a patient with Alzheimer’s. While it cannot cure or reverse the effects of Alzheimer’s, it can help to reduce depression, apathy, sleeplessness and other side effects such as challenges swallowing.

It may be difficult for you to watch your friend or loved one change through the disease, but your presence and efforts are essential to their treatment and care.

Keep Questions and Task Instructions Simple

In opening dialogue with an Alzheimer’s patient, it may be helpful to ask simple yes or no questions. By removing the more complicated open-ended thoughts, the patient may be more at ease in evaluating the question and associating their answer.

So rather than asking, “What would you like for a snack?” ask a series of questions and be patient for each answer. For example, “Would you like a snack?” To a yes, you might follow by asking – even showing – the options, “Would you like a piece of cheese?” If the answer is no, offer and show another option.

This slower step-by-step thought process can help in communicating. If physical examples aren’t on hand such as you’re ordering or going to another location to pick up food, you can try to write down options, or use flash cards.

Likewise, if providing task instructions, offer steps slowly and articulately, one at a time. Saying to a patient that it is “time to go” could lead to confusion or lack of direction. Instead, taking them through the task list can lead to results and understanding.

Ask if they have their shoes on? If they don’t, talk them through locating and putting on their shoes. Do they have a sweater or coat? Do they have their keys, wallet or purse? The same mental checklist that you might go through before preparing to leave or a similar task list will be helpful to an Alzheimer’s patient when presented slowly, clearly, and patiently.

Connect Directly

In the mid- and late-stages of Alzheimer’s, a patient may need your further reassurances. It is likely that to engage you will need to reintroduce yourself upon each visit, even when speaking to a close relative or lifelong friend. Be patient but respectful – remember, it’s the disease and out of their control. Maintain eye contact after your re-introduction and assist in communication with verbal and visual clues. You may also need to engage all senses – sight, sound, touch, taste and/or smell, to be sure they are understanding you.

Listen Carefully

As it is an incurable, progressive disease, Alzheimer’s disease facts state that it will become more challenging to communicate with a patient. Even as you ask shorter yes/no questions, use visual aids and other clues, responses to questions or stories shared may be harder to understand. Try to listen to the sentiment of what the patient is telling you, not only the words.

It’s possible that they will mix up words but the context of their story is where you can engage. Or you can read their happiness, sadness, or other emotions. Sometimes, a caregiver who is with the patient regularly can also help you to communicate. And most of all, being there to lend your continued support and care are what is most important to helping them through this difficult disease.

 

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How to Pace Yourself as a Caregiver in Day-to-Day Life


If you’ve suddenly found yourself thrown into the role of caregiver in your family, you cropped-wp-pj-banner-e1532350609729might be feeling overwhelmed. There’s no doubt that you have a lot to do in your day-to-day life and if you’ve just had the responsibility of caring for an elderly family member, your world might be turning upside down. Or, perhaps you have been caring for an aging family member for some time and have started to notice that the tasks are consuming your life. Whether you are just starting out as a caregiver, or you have been doing it for many years, there are lots of things you can do to pace yourself so that you can enjoy your own life, and help make the last few years of a senior’s life meaningful, as well. Here are a few ideas to help you pace yourself as a first-time or long-time caregiver.

Always Eat Your Breakfast First

While you might be tempted to start your day ensuring that the senior in your life is dressed and fed first, you need to ensure that you are keeping up your morning routine by getting yourself ready and getting yourself a healthy, balanced breakfast first. Once the caregiving portion of your day starts, it can quickly be hijacked by responsibility and unforeseen circumstances, such as a cold or flu or a forgotten doctor’s appointment. Before you know it, it’ll be noon and you won’t have eaten a bite all morning. So be sure to take the time to care for yourself first thing in the morning and stick to it. It might mean getting up a few minutes early to enjoy a wholesome meal, but make the time to do it each day.

Afternoon Breaks

It’s not uncommon for many seniors to drift into a nap in the early afternoon, particularly after lunch or a heavy meal. Isn’t that true of all of us, though? So if you find that the senior you are taking care of has a tendency to take a nap after lunch, or even mid-afternoon, make the most of that time and do something for yourself to bring you back to your world. If you have kids at home, this might be the time of day when you go to school to pick them up. It’s not a lot of time, but getting to see them on a regular basis will help you maintain a sense of routine in your life. Or, perhaps you’ll enjoy your lunch during afternoon nap time so that you can catch up on your favorite television shows and enjoy a meal in the quiet of the afternoon. Whatever it is that you choose to do with that time, be sure to take or make breaks for yourself throughout the afternoon.

Suppertime Relief

One of the best things you can do for yourself to pace yourself throughout the day is arrange for another family member or caregiver to come during or after the evening meal times. This will allow you to go home to your family and spend some quality time with them. If your senior family member is actually residing with you, then it still important to arrange for additional caregiving after the evening meal so that you can tend to your needs. Perhaps you need to run errands for your family, or you need to attend a special dinner for a friend. Many caregivers get caught up in the 24/7 environment of caregiving because they feel like they need to do everything themselves. It’s so important to take care of yourself as a caregiver and try to retain some sense of routine in your own life, while caring for someone else.

Final Thoughts

So whether you have just started your journey as a caregiver, or you have been in the “business” for many years, there’s no need to let yourself and your self-care fall to the wayside. Paying attention to what you need, following a calendar so that you know what and when you need to do things for yourself and your family, and ensuring you take regular breaks are all important things to consider as you continue on your journey as a caregiver. Be sure to check in with yourself once in a while to make sure the routines you have created are still working for you and don’t be afraid to adjust them to meet your new needs. Finally, don’t be afraid to ask for the help you may need from time to time. You can’t do it all and it’s important to recognize that you shouldn’t have to! Be sure to enlist the help of other family members and take the time away that you need.

Kristen Heller: Kristen is a passionate writer, teacher, and mother to a wonderful son. When free time presents itself you can find her tackling her lifelong goal of learning the piano!
Contact info: khellerwrites@gmail.com

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Tips on How to Plan and Pay for Long-Term Care


cropped-wp-pj-banner-e1532350609729As the senior population in the United States grows, more and more people will need long-term support and services. Long-term care includes assistance through institutions such as nursing homes, assisted residential care, adult day services and in-home care. The need for long-term support and services depends on the senior’s ability to manage the tasks and responsibilities of daily living safely.

According to AARP:

  • Seniors are the primary demographic needing long-term care because functional disability increases with advancing age.
  • 13 million Americans ages 18 or older needed long-term support and services in 2014; 60 percent of these adults were age 65 or older.
  • An estimated 52 percent of present-day seniors will develop a severe disability that will require long-term care at some point.
  • Women are more likely than men (58 percent vs. 47 percent) to need long-term support and services. Furthermore, women on average need assistance for longer — 2.5 years vs. 1.5 years.
  • More than half of seniors with disabilities rely exclusively on unpaid help. About 75 percent of people who used paid help also relied on family and friends for unpaid care.

Two thirds of seniors today will need long-term care at some point in the future with 20 percent of them needing it for longer than five years. Without an established plan and funding for long-term support and services, the responsibility for cost and care falls on your loved ones. To protect your family and ensure you get the care you want, it’s important to plan for the possibility of needing long-term support and services while securing a way to pay for them.

How Much Does Long-Term Care Cost?

It may not surprise you to find out that people wildly underestimate how much long-term services cost on average. One-third of Americans think home health care expenses are under $417 a month. The actual national median rate for long-term care costs is about nine times that estimate.

Median annual cost of long-term care:

  • Adult day care – $17,680 annually ($1,474/month)
  • Assisted living facility – $43,539 ($3,628/month)
  • Homemaker services – $45,760 ($3,813/month)
  • In-home health aide – $46,332 ($3,861/month)
  • Semi-private room in nursing home – $82,125 ($6,844/month)
  • Private room in nursing home – $92,378 ($7,698/month)

Paying for Long-Term Care

Older adults receive federally funded health insurance through Medicare. While Medicare pays for many health services, it does not pay for long-term care costs. Seniors can look into alternative policies like Humana Medicare Advantage plans, which offer the same coverage as Medicare Parts A and B. Some plans may include additional benefits for prescriptions, dental, vision, fitness services, caregiver support and a 24/7 nursing advice line. Having comprehensive health care prevents serious illness and injury that requires long-term support and services.

Long-term care insurance can cover all costs that Medicare plans do not. These policies protect your family’s savings while giving you more choices when it comes to the services and support you need. The average premiums for a 60-year-old couple are $2,010 a year when combined, but that small investment can end up saving your family hundreds of thousands on your long-term care in the future.

Avoiding Long-Term Care

One-third of Americans never need long-term care in their senior years. These people tend to be proactive when it comes to maintaining their health and avoiding injury. Make positive lifestyle choices such as exercising regularly, eating a well-balanced diet and being social. Research also suggests that habits such as learning new skills, pursuing passions and practicing mindfulness also contribute to longevity, however, genetics have a lot to do with how long you live. Researching family history and possibly undergoing predictive and presymptomatic genetic tests are the best ways to predict how your genes will affect your aging process.

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The majority of seniors in the United States will need long-term care at some point. Healthy lifestyle choices can mitigate your risks, but it’s still important to plan for the extreme costs. Look into long-term insurance plans that cover the out-of-pocket expenses of long-term support and services.

Author: June is the co-creator of Rise Up for Caregivers, which offers support for family members and friends who have taken on the responsibility of caring for their loved ones. She is author of the upcoming book, The Complete Guide to Caregiving: A Daily Companion for New Senior Caregivers.  June Duncan <june@riseupforcaregivers.org>

 

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Spirituality Finds Its Way Home


Photo Credit: Priscilla Du Preez UnSplash

As the life-expectancy of the population rises, so does the interest in the role of spirituality in their lives. A survey from the Pew Research Center shows religion is considered very important among adults age 65+. Though important, spirituality has a different meaning to different people, including caregivers and their patients or family members.

What is Spirituality?
When people think of spirituality, normally the first thing that comes to mind is a single specific religion. However, the definition of spirituality is much more than a religion; it ranges from a specific religious belief to anything which provides meaning in life. Spirituality is more of an eclectic mix of beliefs and practices contributing to overall mental health and well-being.

Does Spirituality Help?
Caregivers understand helping on a physical level, but they also have the opportunity to help fulfill the mental needs of the one they care for. Spirituality helps by giving people hope, comfort, and the ability to cope with stress. For both the older adult and the caregiver, spirituality can allow them the opportunity to be a part of a community, and feel as if they have support with whatever issues they’re going through. Spirituality is appealing to those searching for meaning and strength in life, and offers the opportunity to develop a game plan for whatever life is bringing their way.

What Is Being Spiritual?
Setting aside time for meditation and other self-reflective techniques can assist caregivers dealing with stressful changes occurring in their lives. Finding positivity in their role and allowing it to make them stronger is an aspect of spirituality some might not have considered. Another possibility is speaking to a Chaplin or religious figure, which might offer the opportunity to have someone listen with a non-judgmental ear.  For the patients or loved ones they care for, it may mean community service to others to avoid isolation, or a personal belief that sparks a sense of well-being, positivity, and resilience.

Taking Care
The responsibility of care-giving is not easy to shoulder. If a caregiver is too focused on giving, their spiritual needs might fall by the wayside, affecting their well-being and their ability to cope. Spiritual stereotypes abound for both caregivers and older adults, but breaking through those may be the difference in the quality of life for everyone.

Guest blogger Jess Walter  is a freelance writer and mother. She loves the freedom that comes with freelance life and the additional time it means she gets to spend with her family and pets. You can contact Jess at: jesswalterwriter@gmail.com

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Ways to Keep Your Brain Sharp as You Age


Have you found yourself having the odd “senior moment”? Don’t worry they happen to the best of us every now and again. Even young adults have been known to wander into a room and forget what they’re looking for. Lapses in memory can occur at any age, but as you grow older, you may well find them happening a little more frequently. We all know this happens but that doesn’t stop it from being rather upsetting. You might be worried that dementia is setting in or you’re losing metal function. Certain changes are happening in your brain and these are what cause fleeting memory problems. Thankfully, there are things you can do to protect and sharpen your mind.

Never Stop Learning New Things

Research has shown that keeping your brain active by learning new things stimulates connections between nerve cells. As well as creating new connections, it can also help to generate new cells. There are lots of ways you can mentally stimulate yourself. Reading, word puzzles and math problems are good examples. You can also learn something new. Look for courses taking place locally or go online and find out about Udemy membership cost. When you’re working, there are many parts of your job that will keep your brain active. However, when you retire, you need to find new ways to exercise your brain.

Physical Exercise

There are a number of ways that regular exercise can help your mind. Research on animals has shown that those who exercise regularly increase the number of blood vessels bringing oxygen-rich blood to the brain that regulates thought. It is also beneficial for the development of new nerve cells along with increasing brain cell connections. This then results in a brain that’s more efficient, pliable and able to adapt. As well as benefiting the brain, regular exercise also lowers blood pressure, helps the balance of blood sugar levels, reduces mental stress and lowers cholesterol levels.

Good Nutrition

Eating healthily is good for your mind, body and soul. A Mediterranean style diet that includes lots of fruit, vegetables, fish, nuts, unsaturated fats such as olive oil and plant proteins will reduce the chances of you developing cognitive impairment and dementia. Whole grains, oily fish, blueberries, tomatoes, eggs, blackcurrants, pumpkin seeds, broccoli and sage have also been shown to boost your brain power.

Use All Your Senses When Learning

You are far more likely to remember something if all of your senses are involved. More areas of your brain will be used when it comes to retaining the memory. Studies have been done that compared the ability of adults to remember an image when presented along with a smell. When the same images were shown later, without the associated odor, fewer were remembered.

One last point worth mentioning is the need to believe in yourself. Our brains are very powerful organs and negative stereotypes can have a profound effect on individuals. Convincing yourself that your senior moments can’t be helped is very counterproductive. Believe that you can improve your memory, and it will be more likely to happen.

 

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Caring For A Loved One And Their Skin


There is approximately 43.5 million caregivers in the US that are unpaid, meaning they’re usually taking the responsibility of caring for family and friends. Skin thins and loses its elasticity as it ages, making it more prone to dryness, injury and ulcers. These can all be serious for a senior as they can’t fight off infections as effectively, so if you’re their caregiver you need to stay informed of skin conditions, how to prevent them and how to treat them.

Worried About Wrinkles?

As you hit middle age it’s common to start focusing on creams to eliminate wrinkles, but various skin conditions can present themselves posing a bigger problem. 1 out of 10 middle aged men and women will experience the redness, stinging, spots and regular cheek flushing of rosacea, making it a physically and emotionally distressing condition. While there is no cure for rosacea, it can be treated, and triggers can be avoided to improve symptoms. Triggers can be stress, food, alcohol and caffeine, so identifying what causes your flare ups will benefit your skin. Home treatments include regularly hydrating the skin with antibacterial moisturizers, like coconut oil, and cleaning the skin with cold green tea, which is known for its antibacterial properties.

Pressure Ulcers 

Elderly skin can become complicated to care for with a lot of issues, often dependent on lifestyle, habits and genetics. In America 43% of senior citizens require help with daily tasks with many being entirely dependent on caregivers. Being confined to a bed or sitting for the majority of the day can cause skin to breakdown and result in pressure ulcers. These are sores that need regular medical attention and can go as deep as the muscle and bone. They are notoriously difficult to heal; especially as elderly skin doesn’t repair or renew skin cells as quickly as younger skin does. If you’re a caregiver for an elderly person it’s important to regularly check their skin in pressure areas, such as their buttocks and heels of the feet. If skin is discoloured or starting to break down seek medical help to avoid them getting worse, reposition the person regularly and apply barrier creams to reduce the risk of pressure ulcers.

Tips For Caregivers 

As we age we don’t need to bathe as often as we move around a lot less. Frequent washing can cause skin to dry out, so showering or bathing your loved one three to four times a week is better and applying a moisturizer afterwards will help to keep it hydrated. Dry, itchy skin affects more than 30 million Americans, and while it may seem like a small problem, it can quickly escalate into bigger issues for senior skin. Trimming your loved ones nails will reduce the risk of them scratching accidentally catching and tearing the skin, which can easily lead to infections. If they do get a cut make sure it’s kept clean to reduce the risk and monitor how it’s healing.

Being a caregiver is one of the most rewarding things you can do in your life, especially when you’re giving back to a loved one by doing so. It’s also a very emotional and stressful experience as you are responsible for another person’s wellbeing. Skincare is an easy aspect of caregiving to overlook when there is many other medical conditions going on and needs to be met. Having a simple skincare routine to follow with them is the easiest way to also meet their skincare needs.

Guest blogger Jess Walter  is a freelance writer and mother. She loves the freedom that comes with freelance life and the additional time it means she gets to spend with her family and pets. You can contact Jess at: jesswalterwriter@gmail.com

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Using Stories to Cope With Caregiving


cropped-wp-pj-banner-e1532350609729Caregiving is one of the most challenging things to do in life, whether you’re caring for an aging parent or a disabled loved one. It’s important for caregivers to take the time to take care of themselves, but that can be difficult when you’re caring for someone who needs round-the-clock care.

Sharing stories — both your own stories as a caregiver and stories from other caregivers — can help you learn how to cope with caregiving. In fact, listening to others’ stories can help you grieve, cope and thrive as a caregiver.

Finding Stories

Where can you find caregiver stories to help you cope with your own situation? That can be more difficult than you might think, as not everyone is comfortable telling their story. However, you can tap into plenty of resources to find these tales of hope.

The Whole Care Network is a web-based resource that shares caregiver stories in blog posts and also in the form of the podcast. This is a great place to find stories similar to your own and even tell your own story if you feel comfortable doing so. Other websites, like Caregiver.org, allow you to do the same — read the stories others have submitted and even submit your own.

Sites like Medium, the free blog publishing platform, can give you a voice. Platforms like Medium are often better for this than starting your own blog because they come with a built-in audience, so you can tell your story without the stress of marketing your content.

There are even videos and documentaries that might help you puzzle out the problems of your daily life as a caregiver. Do a little research and you’ll be pleasantly surprised at how many resources you find to share your story online.

Telling Stories

Have you ever considered telling your own caregiver’s story?

Not everyone does. Sharing a story about your experiences as a caregiver is an emotional decision, but it is one that could help other individuals who are having problems with their own situations.

If you’re having trouble with one aspect of your life, writing about it can help you look at it from a new perspective. In addition to this, the story you share about your own struggles might help someone else who is going through the same thing.

You don’t have to write or publish a book for people to listen — just write your story and share it.

It’s All About Hope

Being a caregiver isn’t easy, even for the strongest person. The one thing everyone has to hold on to is hope, and hearing stories from others who are going through similar experiences can help make it easier to hold on to that sliver of hope. Hearing stories of someone else’s grief can also help you in navigating your own experiences.

Sharing stories is all about hope. That’s why sharing your own stories and reading the stories of others is so important — to foster hope for the future, hope for a better life and hope that you’ll be able to make it through your next day as a caregiver.

Authors Bio: Kayla Matthews is a lifestyle and productivity writer whose work has been featured on Lifehacker, The Next Web, MakeUseOf and Inc.com. You can read more posts from Kayla on her blog, Productivity Theory.

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Money Conversation: How to Manage the Finances of Your Aging Parents


Your parents might need a little extra help in their advanced age. Their finances are equally as important as their health. Aging people retire, meaning that they’re unlikely to come into any new sources of income. The money they have is the money they have, and it needs to last an indefinite period of time.

Talk to your parents about financial security as soon as possible to ensure their safe future.

Create a Productive Financial Environment

You parents may feel a deep attachment to their home, but can they still afford it? If the home is already payed off and the utilities are reasonable, they may not want to sell it. If the home is highly profitable and they’re willing to downsize, the profit they acquire from the sale of their home can give them some financial padding.

Smaller homes are typically less expensive to maintain. Utility bills cost less, especially for cooling and heating. Less property means a lower cost for lawn maintenance, and if the roof ever needs to be repaired, it’s a smaller roof. On top of the financial benefits, smaller homes equipped for seniors are often easier to navigate and maintain. They may allow your parents to experience independence for longer. You might also want to investigate assisted living facilities – your parents might need some extra help.

Use Savings in Conjunction with Investments

People of advanced age need savings to cover emergency costs. If they’re still active and vital, they might even want to take the occasional trip away for a week or so to socialize and enjoy their retirement. While savings are important, it’s important to note that their growth is meager. Even in a high yield savings account, the money will still grow slowly.

Your parents are never too old to start trading. By using some of their money to trade or invest, they’ll see larger returns much faster than they would patiently waiting on a savings account to deliver interest. A massive investment isn’t necessary. They can start by investing a little bit and slowly make more investments with what they gain. This is a great way for seniors with no expandable source of income to see more money than they ordinarily would have.

Set Up Autopayments

Seniors may not remember to pay their bills on time. By setting up autopay options for the things they use everyday (like their household utilities, rent, and phone bills), they won’t need to remember to make payments on time. This will prevent service interruption. In order to prevent autopay bills from disrupting the budget, a separate account can be created and funded specifically for autopayments.

Use your parent’s main bank account for their daily, fluctuating expenses. They’ll only need to concern themselves with the , and having the bills come out of a separate account that has already been funded will prevent them from accidentally overspending and having a bill come due that will overdraft their account.

Create a Functional Budget

The kind of budget you create will largely depend on your parents’ level of independence. If they do their own shopping, rather than depending on grocery deliveries, they need to be able to understand how much money they have, as well as the minimums and maximums they can spend.

Bill money set aside, sit down with them and examine how much money they have left over. This money needs to be divided into categories and priorities. If your parents have a basic understanding of technology, you can set them up with budget tracking apps on their phones. They can input their expenses based on their receipts and actively track what they’re spending and when they’re spending it.

Simplifying your parents’ finances will allow them to enjoy their independence for as long as possible, helping them make the most of their agency and live a fulfilling life. Always be there to help when they need it.

About Audrey:

Audrey Robinson is a blogger, currently writing on behalf of online data libraries like Aubiz. She might often be found online, sharing her tips and suggestions for self-improvement, improving one’s career opportunities and living a more stress-free life. Feel free to reach out to her on @AudreyyRobinson

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7 Tips for Doing a Criminal Background Check of Your Caregiver


In some ways, a caregiver’s job is even more delicate than a babysitter’s job. Caregivers need to have medical and emergency response knowledge when providing care for a patient that has special needs. You’re entrusting this individual with a great deal of responsibility, and before you do that, a criminal background check might be in order.

  1. Inform The Caregiver of the Background Check

You might find yourself in hot water if you choose to run a background check without the consent of the individual. You should ask first and have the person sign a form that states that they consent to such check being run. The form should include all areas that will be explored during this check. Individuals who don’t consent to a background check might have something to hide – never take their word for it. Don’t work with someone who is uncomfortable with a background check.

  1. Perform Relevant Checks

If the caregiver’s job would put them in a position where they’re handling money or delicate assets, you might also want to perform a credit check on the individual. If they have a history of being reckless with money, you don’t want them to have any control over your loved one’s assets. Run these checks concurrent with the criminal background check.

  1. Know What is and Isn’t Off Limits

You may not be able to research all areas of caregivers background due to restrictions and limitations based on the availability of personal and confidential records to the public. Prying or attempting to obtain these off limits records through other means might be a crime. Never misrepresent your identity when conducting a background check and accept what’s given to you.

  1. Follow Local Laws

Every state, province, and territory has different laws regarding what information can be made available on background checks and how the person who obtained that information is allowed to use it. If you’re unsure of what you can legally do, check with a legal expert. If you live in Australia, get help from a lawyer in Australia. If you live in the United States, get advice from a lawyer located in the state you’re conducting a check in or the state where the caregiver’s record exists.

  1. Use Checks in Conjunction with References

Since some information may not be made available through a criminal background check, you’ll also need to vet a potential caregiver through their previous employers and educators. They can give you all the details and let you know if they’ve ever noticed any suspicious or borderline criminal behavior. Use this information in conjunction with the background check’s findings to make a thoroughly informed decision.

  1. Research the Agency Providing the Caregiver

It’s more likely than not that the caregiver already went through a top notch background and credentials check when they sought placement through the agency that represents them. This check may have been more thorough than your check. Talk to the agency about how they screen their caregivers. Research their history and reputation. If there haven’t been any reported problems with the caregivers they supply, chances are good that they have high standards.

  1. Speak with the Caregiver Following the Check

Even if the caregiver has a criminal record, this may not be a cause for worry. A minor marijuana charge from fifteen years ago may not have any impact on their ability to be an excellent caregiver. A disturbing the peace charge that resulted from a passionate form of activism doesn’t indicate that an individual is violent or a thief. Always speak to the caregiver about relevant findings before making a hiring decision.

While background checks help, you also need to follow your intuition. If your gut is telling you that you would be uncomfortable putting this person in charge of the care of a loved one, don’t do it. You need both the facts and your instincts on your side when making such an important decision.

Gust Writer Lucy Taylor is an avid blogger who enjoys sharing her tips and suggestions with her online readers. Working as a legal expert at LY Lawyers, Lucy often helps people dealing with legal problems, addictions and crime.  You can contact Lucy at lucytayllor.lylawyers@gmail.com

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How to Ensure Your Loved One Gets the Right Care


One thing that is sometimes inevitable is people becoming unwell. Whether it is a result of lifestyle choices or actions that could have been avoided, it could end up having lifelong effects. Caring for someone who is sick can be difficult and often requires a great amount of patience. It is also imperative that they get the best care possible to make getting through every day easier. You may be reading this because you’re a caregiver or responsible for a loved one who’s battling a long-term or terminal illness. If that happens to be the case, you’re in the right place as this article is going to tell you how to ensure your loved one gets the right care.

Know What Their Needs Are

Before you can ensure your loved one gets the best care possible, it’s imperative that you understand their needs are. In order to do this, however, you should learn as much about their disease or illness as possible. It could mean taking time out to research their condition so that you can learn about what the best solutions available are to help them cope. Another alternative is to ask a medical professional about how best to take care of them, and this is relevant whether you’re their caregiver or looking for someone else to help with regular care.

Offer the Right Care

Taking care of a loved one when they’re suffering from a terminal illness can be difficult. It is often a full-time job, so you should seriously think about if you have what it takes to give them the care they need. Some tips if you do decide to be their primary caregiver include being patient, making time for yourself, and getting help if you need it. If you do decide to get a professional caregiver to offer help, it’s important that you’re confident in the services they offer. You should also pay attention to any signs that something may be wrong. If you feel your loved one is experiencing clinical negligence, then you should contact an organization like Minton Morrill Solicitors as they may be able to offer help and advice on what you can do and if you can be compensated.

Look After You

If you decide to be a primary caregiver for an ill loved one, it’s important that you take the time out to look after yourself. It’s key that you don’t underestimate the amount of work that goes into being a caregiver and how demanding as well as emotionally, physically, and mentally tasking it can be. If you want to give the best care, it is therefore essential that you spend time doing things you love, getting out of the house for fresh air and endeavor to retain a personal life.

Getting the right care for your loved ones is extremely important, so taking the time out to explore your options is key. Aside from the tips mentioned above, your goal should be to pay attention to their needs and find ways to meet them. By doing so, you should find that you have peace of mind knowing that they get the best care possible.

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